metalloid

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met·al·loid

 (mĕt′l-oid′)
n.
1. A nonmetallic element, such as arsenic, that has some of the chemical properties of a metal. Most metalloids behave as semiconductors.
2. A nonmetallic element, such as carbon, that can form an alloy with metals.
adj. also met·al·loi·dal (mĕt′l-oid′l)
1. Relating to or having the properties of a metalloid.
2. Having the appearance of a metal.

metalloid

(ˈmɛtəˌlɔɪd)
n
(Elements & Compounds) a nonmetallic element, such as arsenic or silicon, that has some of the properties of a metal
adj
1. (Chemistry) of or being a metalloid
2. (Chemistry) resembling a metal

met•al•loid

(ˈmɛt lˌɔɪd)

n.
1. a nonmetal that in combination with a metal forms an alloy.
2. an element with both metallic and nonmetallic properties, as silicon or boron.
adj.
3. of or pertaining to a metalloid.
4. resembling both a metal and a nonmetal.
[1825–35]

met·al·loid

(mĕt′l-oid′)
1. An element that is not a metal but that has some properties of metals. Arsenic, for example, is a metalloid that looks like a metal, but is a poor conductor of electricity.
2. A nonmetallic element, such as carbon, that can form alloys with metals.

metalloid

An element which has both metallic and nonmetallic properties.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.metalloid - of or being a nonmetallic element that has some of the properties of metalmetalloid - of or being a nonmetallic element that has some of the properties of metal; "arsenic is a metalloid element"
nonmetal, nonmetallic - not containing or resembling or characteristic of a metal; "nonmetallic elements"
Translations
Halbmetall

metalloid

[ˈmɛtəˌlɔɪd] nmetalloide m
References in periodicals archive ?
They also examined the concentration of a large group of metals and metalloids in several species of fish and their relationship with the available fraction of the remnants collected, found in the fish's digestive tract.
Metals and metalloids in fruits of tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum) and their cultivation soils in the Basque Country: concentrations and accumulation trends.
Over the years, research has shown that metals and metalloids, which are metal-like elements, can negatively impact health, even at fairly low doses.
Total elemental concentrations of [PM.sub.2.5] metals and metalloids (henceforth all referred to as metals), including titanium (Ti), manganese (Mn), iron (Fe), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), aluminum (Al), lead (Pb), silicon (Si), calcium (Ca), sodium (Na), and potassium (K), were analyzed from the daily [PM.sub.2.5] filters using X-ray fluorescence.
HMs is a general collective term applying to metals and metalloids with an atomic density > 6 g/[cm.sup.3] (Awodele, Popoola, Amadi, Coker, & Akintonwa, 2013).
In turn, leaching tests are used to predict both the potential mobilization of metals and metalloids to groundwater and their bioavailability to plants under natural conditions [21].
Taylor et al., "A review on the importance of metals and metalloids in atmospheric dust and aerosol from mining operations," Science of the Total Environment, vol.
Several recent publications have highlighted the presence of metallic elements, metalloids, and mineral compounds in herbal teas.
The bulkiness and toxicity are interconneeted with heavy metals including metalloids at low level of exposure (He et al., 2005).
The contaminants include metals and metalloids such as arsenic, zinc, antimony, cadmium, manganese and lead.
Heavy metals and metalloids, such as Cd, Pb, Hg, As, Se, etc.