metanarrative


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metanarrative

(ˈmɛtəˌnærətɪv)
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) (in postmodernist literary theory) a narrative about a narrative or narratives
[C20: from meta- + narrative]
References in periodicals archive ?
This is not to say, however, that the revisionists do not have a replacement metanarrative of their own.
But I remain unconvinced that the thought of Israel as still in exile formed the principal metanarrative governing either the thought of the time or Jesus' understanding of his own ministry.
Maso's metanarrative critique of society raises stunning questions about war, fathers, media (televised execution?), and children's songs to name a few.
Moreover, his archaeological "salvage work" and the persuasive metanarrative that frames it also rebutts the oversimplifications that abounded in the H.
The outcomes for children from digital libraries are weighed, and a policy metanarrative is constructed from the conflicting images of the child in the digital world by including the computer as an active protagonist interacting constructively with the child.
Before opening Brown's tome my knowledge of post-modernism was largely confined to simple unreferenced definitions like "Post-modernism is the rejection of the metanarrative" and question-and-answer couplets like, Q: "What is postmodernism?
For example, the neglected novel Eumeswil (1977) provides the focal point for Renner's essay on Junger's 'post-modernism' which, he argues, is not simply a matter of Lyotardian rejection of metanarrative, but also of a complex example of intertextual writing.
Its subject matter is at the same time the story of Harjo's people, the poet's personal story, and the human metanarrative; it is life and the lessons we each must learn and pass on to future generations.
He describes the paradox of witnessing, witnessing beyond the Christian metanarrative hermeneutics, the Christian background of witnessing "beyond," the historical background to witnessing "beyond," Christ as the core of the idea, the examples of the Apostles in witnessing "beyond," the true power of prayer and of the Eucharist, the socio-theolgical dimension of the Eucharist, social organizations and their work, and grasping the concept of witnessing "beyond."
Although Eliot claimed in 1936 that "the Christian world order, is ultimately the only one which, from any point of view, will work" after the horrors of World War II he accepted the failure to reinvigorate metanarrative in literature by constructing a "personal mystical vision" (200) of religion in Four Quartets.
(I once described her as Agnes Martin with an ax to grind.) The metanarrative of her oeuvre is the plucky, independent woman: the single mom surviving on minimum wage, welfare, or alimony and still yearning (perhaps) for her big lug, either divorced or gone off to a Roy Lichtenstein world of macho warfare--to Korea-Vietnam-Kuwait -Iraq-Afghanistan-"On Terror" conflicts colorized by the cinematic duplicity and gung-ho of the Greatest Generation.
Grounding his analysis in scholarship, though not belaboring his own research, and refusing to construct a metanarrative that neatly resolves differences among its key players, Tripet offers us a long, sometimes provocative view of a long, always provocative history.