metanarrative


Also found in: Wikipedia.

metanarrative

(ˈmɛtəˌnærətɪv)
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) (in postmodernist literary theory) a narrative about a narrative or narratives
[C20: from meta- + narrative]
References in periodicals archive ?
Chapter 5 presents a metanarrative analysis of the collaborative and participatory narrative inquiry process the research teams undertook over three years and provides hindsight on how the narrative research itself impacted participants' identities, communities, and their relationships, attitudes, and behaviours with Chinese.
Evolution has brought the world beyond the age of religion, and non-theistic evolution is the metanarrative that lets us understand the cosmos and our place in it.
Engels may have put forward his own egalitarian utopia ('primitive communalism') that preceded the rise of property, class distinctions, slavery and so on; and the Marxian metanarrative of 'historical materialism' he applied to women's history was undeniably premised on a purportedly universal schema founded on western models and claims to world leadership.
Reagan braided threads of smaller stories into a compelling metanarrative web.
Metanarrative is following this policy of Enlightenment which science legitimates itself as the carrier of freedom.
This sacrificial service offers the postmodern West a nonhegemonic metanarrative of hope.
Just as Saruman tells a particular story at Isengard, so, too, postmodernism sees the world as being interpreted by stories or narratives, such as the modernist metanarrative that human progress occurs through human reason" (73).
On an intellectual level, sponsored content utilizes metanarrative techniques, where a story is told to justify another story or to look at a story beyond the story (e.
By sidestepping a direct, theoretical engagement with the nature and implications of their interdisciplinary metanarrative, the authors cast the reader as respondent to their contributions.
Make transformation, not incrementalism, the new metanarrative.
The Power of Place, the Problem of Time consistently shows us the benefits of reframing the historical metanarrative of Native-Newcomer relations to focus upon colonialism in Aboriginal history, not merely Aboriginal history within the history of colonialism.
When one metanarrative becomes the norm of a culture, several of these smaller metanarratives are lost or obliterated.