repentance

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re·pen·tance

 (rĭ-pĕn′təns)
n.
1. The act or process of repenting.
2. Remorse or contrition for past conduct or sin. See Synonyms at penitence.

repentance

(rɪˈpɛntəns)
n
1. remorse or contrition for one's past actions or sins
2. an act or the process of being repentant; penitence

re•pent•ance

(rɪˈpɛn tns, -ˈpɛn təns)

n.
deep sorrow, compunction, or contrition for a past sin, wrongdoing, or error.
[1300–50; Middle English repentaunce < Old French repentance. See repent1, -ance]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.repentance - remorse for your past conductrepentance - remorse for your past conduct  
compunction, remorse, self-reproach - a feeling of deep regret (usually for some misdeed)

repentance

noun regret, guilt, grief, sorrow, remorse, contrition, compunction, penitence, self-reproach, sackcloth and ashes, sorriness They showed no repentance during their trial.
Quotations
"Repentance is the virtue of weak minds" [John Dryden The Indian Emperor]
"Amendment is repentance" [Thomas Fuller Gnomologia]
"Joy shall be in heaven over one sinner that repenteth, more than over ninety and nine just persons, which need no repentance" Bible: St. Luke

repentance

noun
A feeling of regret for one's sins or misdeeds:
Theology: attrition.
Translations
تَوْبَه، نَدامَه، أسَف
pokánílítost
angerbod
katumus
megbánás
iîrun

repentance

[rɪˈpentəns] Narrepentimiento m

repentance

[rɪˈpɛntəns] nrepentir m

repentance

nReue f

repentance

[rɪˈpɛntəns] n (frm) → pentimento

repent

(rəˈpent) verb
1. (especially in religion) to be sorry for one's past sins.
2. (with of) to wish that one had not done, made etc. He repented of his generosity.
reˈpentance noun
reˈpentant adjective
(negative unrepentant). a repentant sinner.
References in periodicals archive ?
And, accordingly, he invites them to act in accord with this opportune time (kairos): "Repent (metanoeite), and believe (pisteuete) in the Gospel." Jesus points to the presence of the Son of Man in their midst, making present God's Kingdom by his words and deeds.
(3) Both are said to cry out metanoeite, the imperative plural of metanoein, which English translators since Tyndale have almost universally rendered with "repent." (4) When Erasmus published the first edition of his translation in 1516, the accepted Latin version was poenitentiam agite--literally "do penance"--understood for generations as one of the chief scriptural foundations for the sacrament of penance.
Thus different from the philosophical exhortation to "turn around" (metanoeite), or the prophetic demand for repentance, a clarion call is issued for beating the West and its secular forces everywhere with its own weapons.