metaphor

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met·a·phor

 (mĕt′ə-fôr′, -fər)
n.
1. A figure of speech in which a word or phrase that ordinarily designates one thing is used to designate another, thus making an implicit comparison, as in "a sea of troubles" or "All the world's a stage" (Shakespeare).
2. One thing conceived as representing another; a symbol: "Hollywood has always been an irresistible, prefabricated metaphor for the crass, the materialistic, the shallow, and the craven" (Neal Gabler).

[Middle English methaphor, from Old French metaphore, from Latin metaphora, from Greek, transference, metaphor, from metapherein, to transfer : meta-, meta- + pherein, to carry; see bher- in Indo-European roots.]

met′a·phor′ic (-fôr′ĭk), met′a·phor′i·cal adj.
met′a·phor′i·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

metaphor

(ˈmɛtəfə; -ˌfɔː)
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a figure of speech in which a word or phrase is applied to an object or action that it does not literally denote in order to imply a resemblance, for example he is a lion in battle. Compare simile
[C16: from Latin, from Greek metaphora, from metapherein to transfer, from meta- + pherein to bear]
metaphoric, ˌmetaˈphorical adj
ˌmetaˈphorically adv
ˌmetaˈphoricalness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

met•a•phor

(ˈmɛt əˌfɔr, -fər)

n.
1. the application of a word or phrase to an object or concept it does not literally denote, suggesting comparison to that object or concept, as in "A mighty fortress is our God."
2. something used or regarded as being used to represent something else; symbol: the novel's use of the city as a metaphor for isolation.
[1525–35; < Latin < Greek metaphorá a transfer, n. derivative of metaphérein to transfer. See meta-, -phore]
met`a•phor′i•cal (-ˈfɔr ɪ kəl, -ˈfɒr-) met`a•phor′ic, adj.
met`a•phor′i•cal•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

metaphor

  • trope - A figurative or metaphorical use of a word or phrase.
  • ingrain, ingrained - Ingrain literally means "work into the grain" (originally, of fabric), and ingrained is metaphorically "deep-seated."
  • farce - First meant forcemeat stuffing and came to be used metaphorically when a humorous play was "stuffed" in between two more serious acts of the main theatrical presentation—or for interludes of impromptu buffoonery in a dramatic presentation.
  • relieve - Metaphorically, to "alleviate, lighten," from Latin relevare, "raise again."
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

metaphor

1. A comparison of one person or thing with another by saying that the first is the second, as in “He was a tiger in combat.”
2. Use of an object or action to represent another. Mixed metaphor is the joining together of unmatched metaphors with ridiculous results.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.metaphor - a figure of speech in which an expression is used to refer to something that it does not literally denote in order to suggest a similaritymetaphor - a figure of speech in which an expression is used to refer to something that it does not literally denote in order to suggest a similarity
figure of speech, trope, image, figure - language used in a figurative or nonliteral sense
dead metaphor, frozen metaphor - a metaphor that has occurred so often that it has become a new meaning of the expression (e.g., `he is a snake' may once have been a metaphor but after years of use it has died and become a new sense of the word `snake')
mixed metaphor - a combination of two or more metaphors that together produce a ridiculous effect
synesthetic metaphor - a metaphor that exploits a similarity between experiences in different sense modalities
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

metaphor

noun figure of speech, image, symbol, analogy, emblem, conceit (literary), allegory, trope, figurative expression the writer's use of metaphor
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
إسْتِعارَه، مَجازمجاز
metafora
metafor
metafora
metafora
metafora
myndhvörf
ひゆ比喩
metafora
metafora
metafora
metafor
benzetmemecazmetafor

metaphor

[ˈmetəfɔːʳ] Nmetáfora f
see also mixed B
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

metaphor

[ˈmɛtəfɔːr] nmétaphore f
a metaphor for sth → une métaphore pour qch
... to mix my metaphors ... → ... si j'ose cette métaphore ...
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

metaphor

nMetapher f; to mix one’s metaphorsunterschiedliche Metaphern zusammen verwenden
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

metaphor

[ˈmɛtəfəʳ] nmetafora
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

metaphor

(ˈmetəfə) noun
a form of expression (not using `like' or `as')in which a quality or characteristic is given to a person or thing by using a name, image, adjective etc normally used of something else which has similar qualities etc. `He's a tiger when he's angry' is an example of (a) metaphor.
ˌmetaˈphoric(al) (-ˈfo-) adjective
of, like or using metaphors. metaphorical language.
ˌmetaˈphorically adverb
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
The book contains two photographs, one of Jean-Marie Pontevia, the other of Chaim Soutine, and bears as an epigraph the quotation from Jean-Philippe Rameau: "Il faut corriger l'art par l'art." "La metaphore est fade," begins the invocation to the reader in Michel's 1976 collection "Du depecage comme de l'un des beaux-arts," the first to figure in Le plus reel.
Contents: Dominique Bertrand, "Introduction: A travers les nuits ([XVI.sup.e]-[XVII.sup.e] siecles)"; Jean-Claude Margolin, "Source et signification de la tenebre divine (caligo) d'apres Charles de Bovelles"; Dominique Descotes, "La nuit des mecanistes"; Sylvie Taussig, "Gassendi contre la metaphore: la nuit"; Christophe Martin, "Eclipses du soleil, lumieres de la raison: la nuit dans les Entretiens sur la pluralite des mondes de Fontenelle"; Daniel Menager, "Les berges et la nuit"; Daniela Mauri, "Le temps-espace de la nuit dans les romans de Beroalde de Verville"; Paule Rossetto, "La nuit apprivoisee dans l'Astree"; Pierre Grouix, "Visages du nocturne dans Voyage en Laponie de J.
Ainsi nous renvoie-t-elle a la prose du monde et nous invite a nous inventer une ame afin de parer le monde des belles parures de la metaphore, commente Hassan Chafik.
On retrouve les memes refrains depuis les annonces du Mejdoub et autres ou la metaphore et la sonorite s'associent pour susciter l'attention.
Despues de esta extensa serie de conferencias, el segundo de los escritos, el articulo "La metafora y el problema central de la hermeneutica", originalmente publicado en Revue philosophique de Louvain (1972) (3), supone un preciso acercamiento preparatorio al desarrollo hermeneutico de la metafora y el mundo-del-texto, tal y como es desarrollado en La metaphore vive.
Selon Proust, << seule la metaphore peut donner au style une sorte d'eternite (9) >>, ce procede stylistique etant capable de depasser les apparences de deux objets ou sensations differentes, pour acceder a l' << essence >> des choses, en les soustrayant aux contingences du temps.
Les tableaux d'Elstir representant pour la plupart des scenes marines sont regis par une loi a laquelle le narrateur donne le nom de la metaphore: "J'y pouvais discerner que le charme de chacune [des toiles] consistait en une sorte de metamorphose des choses representees, analogue a celle qu'en poesie on nomme metaphore et que si Dieu le Pere avait cree les choses en les nommant, c'est en leur otant leur nom, ou en leur donnant un autre qu'Elstir les recreait" (JF 399).