metaphor

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met·a·phor

 (mĕt′ə-fôr′, -fər)
n.
1. A figure of speech in which a word or phrase that ordinarily designates one thing is used to designate another, thus making an implicit comparison, as in "a sea of troubles" or "All the world's a stage" (Shakespeare).
2. One thing conceived as representing another; a symbol: "Hollywood has always been an irresistible, prefabricated metaphor for the crass, the materialistic, the shallow, and the craven" (Neal Gabler).

[Middle English methaphor, from Old French metaphore, from Latin metaphora, from Greek, transference, metaphor, from metapherein, to transfer : meta-, meta- + pherein, to carry; see bher- in Indo-European roots.]

met′a·phor′ic (-fôr′ĭk), met′a·phor′i·cal adj.
met′a·phor′i·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

metaphor

(ˈmɛtəfə; -ˌfɔː)
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a figure of speech in which a word or phrase is applied to an object or action that it does not literally denote in order to imply a resemblance, for example he is a lion in battle. Compare simile
[C16: from Latin, from Greek metaphora, from metapherein to transfer, from meta- + pherein to bear]
metaphoric, ˌmetaˈphorical adj
ˌmetaˈphorically adv
ˌmetaˈphoricalness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

met•a•phor

(ˈmɛt əˌfɔr, -fər)

n.
1. the application of a word or phrase to an object or concept it does not literally denote, suggesting comparison to that object or concept, as in "A mighty fortress is our God."
2. something used or regarded as being used to represent something else; symbol: the novel's use of the city as a metaphor for isolation.
[1525–35; < Latin < Greek metaphorá a transfer, n. derivative of metaphérein to transfer. See meta-, -phore]
met`a•phor′i•cal (-ˈfɔr ɪ kəl, -ˈfɒr-) met`a•phor′ic, adj.
met`a•phor′i•cal•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

metaphor

  • trope - A figurative or metaphorical use of a word or phrase.
  • ingrain, ingrained - Ingrain literally means "work into the grain" (originally, of fabric), and ingrained is metaphorically "deep-seated."
  • farce - First meant forcemeat stuffing and came to be used metaphorically when a humorous play was "stuffed" in between two more serious acts of the main theatrical presentation—or for interludes of impromptu buffoonery in a dramatic presentation.
  • relieve - Metaphorically, to "alleviate, lighten," from Latin relevare, "raise again."
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

metaphor

1. A comparison of one person or thing with another by saying that the first is the second, as in “He was a tiger in combat.”
2. Use of an object or action to represent another. Mixed metaphor is the joining together of unmatched metaphors with ridiculous results.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.metaphor - a figure of speech in which an expression is used to refer to something that it does not literally denote in order to suggest a similaritymetaphor - a figure of speech in which an expression is used to refer to something that it does not literally denote in order to suggest a similarity
figure of speech, trope, image, figure - language used in a figurative or nonliteral sense
dead metaphor, frozen metaphor - a metaphor that has occurred so often that it has become a new meaning of the expression (e.g., `he is a snake' may once have been a metaphor but after years of use it has died and become a new sense of the word `snake')
mixed metaphor - a combination of two or more metaphors that together produce a ridiculous effect
synesthetic metaphor - a metaphor that exploits a similarity between experiences in different sense modalities
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

metaphor

noun figure of speech, image, symbol, analogy, emblem, conceit (literary), allegory, trope, figurative expression the writer's use of metaphor
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
إسْتِعارَه، مَجازمجاز
metafora
metafor
metafora
metafora
metafora
myndhvörf
ひゆ比喩
metafora
metafora
metafora
metafor
benzetmemecazmetafor

metaphor

[ˈmetəfɔːʳ] Nmetáfora f
see also mixed B
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

metaphor

[ˈmɛtəfɔːr] nmétaphore f
a metaphor for sth → une métaphore pour qch
... to mix my metaphors ... → ... si j'ose cette métaphore ...
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

metaphor

nMetapher f; to mix one’s metaphorsunterschiedliche Metaphern zusammen verwenden
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

metaphor

[ˈmɛtəfəʳ] nmetafora
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

metaphor

(ˈmetəfə) noun
a form of expression (not using `like' or `as')in which a quality or characteristic is given to a person or thing by using a name, image, adjective etc normally used of something else which has similar qualities etc. `He's a tiger when he's angry' is an example of (a) metaphor.
ˌmetaˈphoric(al) (-ˈfo-) adjective
of, like or using metaphors. metaphorical language.
ˌmetaˈphorically adverb
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
Further, he was fond of using metaphors which, compounded in the study, were apt to sound either cramped or out of place as he delivered them in fragments.
He draws his metaphors from the clouds, the seasons, the birds, the beasts, and the vegetable world.
Nevertheless, in that throng, upon which the four allegories vied with each other in pouring out floods of metaphors, there was no ear more attentive, no heart that palpitated more, not an eye was more haggard, no neck more outstretched, than the eye, the ear, the neck, and the heart of the author, of the poet, of that brave Pierre Gringoire, who had not been able to resist, a moment before, the joy of telling his name to two pretty girls.
Both Imagination and Fancy naturally express themselves, often and effectively, through the use of metaphors, similes, and suggestive condensed language.
Metaphor is the application of an alien name by transference either from genus to species, or from species to genus, or from species to species, or by analogy, that is, proportion Thus from genus to species, as: 'There lies my ship'; for lying at anchor is a species of lying.
Pardon the coarseness of this metaphor. My anxiety to be of service to you rushes into words; lays my meaning, in the rough, at your feet; and leaves your taste to polish it with the choicest ornaments of the English language.
But the whole, to continue the same metaphor, consists in the cookery of the author; for, as Mr Pope tells us--
When I say petticoat, I use the word in its literal sense, not colloquially as a metaphor for its usual wearer, meaning thereby a dainty feminine undergarment seen only by men on rainy days, and one might add washing-days.
I use all the hyperbole of metaphor, and tell what centuries of time and profounds of unthinkable agony and horror can obtain in each interval of all the intervals between the notes of a quick jig played quickly on the piano.
He recollected Cronshaw's whimsical metaphor of the Persian carpet; he had thought of it often; but Cronshaw with his faun-like humour had refused to make his meaning clear: he repeated that it had none unless one discovered it for oneself.
"You have at all events taken your share in using good practical precautions for the town, and that is the best mode of asking for protection," said Lydgate, with a strong distaste for the broken metaphor and bad logic of the banker's religion, somewhat increased by the apparent deafness of his sympathy.
Indeed, it seems that in defining contraries of every kind men have recourse to a spatial metaphor, for they say that those things are contraries which, within the same class, are separated by the greatest possible distance.