metastasis

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me·tas·ta·sis

 (mĭ-tăs′tə-sĭs)
n. pl. me·tas·ta·ses (-sēz′) Medicine
1. Transmission of pathogenic microorganisms or cancerous cells from an original site to one or more sites elsewhere in the body, usually by way of the blood vessels or lymphatics.
2. A secondary cancerous growth formed by transmission of cancerous cells from a primary growth located elsewhere in the body.

[Greek, from methistanai, to change : meta-, meta- + histanai, to cause to stand, place; see stā- in Indo-European roots.]

met′a·stat′ic (mĕt′ə-stăt′ĭk) adj.
met′a·stat′i·cal·ly adv.

metastasis

(mɪˈtæstəsɪs)
n, pl -ses (-ˌsiːz)
1. (Pathology) pathol the spreading of a disease, esp cancer cells, from one part of the body to another
2. (Rhetoric) a transformation or change, as in rhetoric, from one point to another
3. (Biochemistry) a rare word for metabolism
[C16: via Latin from Greek: transition]
metastatic adj
ˌmetaˈstatically adv

me•tas•ta•sis

(məˈtæs tə sɪs)

n., pl. -ses (-ˌsiz)
a. the spread of disease-producing organisms or of malignant or cancerous cells to other parts of the body by way of the blood or lymphatic vessels or membranous surfaces.
b. the condition produced by this.
[1580–90; < Greek metástasis a changing. See meta-, stasis]
met•a•stat•ic (ˌmɛt əˈstæt ɪk) adj.
met`a•stat′i•cal•ly, adv.

me·tas·ta·sis

(mə-tăs′tə-sĭs)
The spread of cancerous cells from one area of the body to other areas.

metastasize verb

metastasis

the spread of malignancies, characterized by the cancerous invasion of the lymphatic system, the blood, and body organs. — metastatic, adj.metastasize, v.
See also: Cancer

metastasis

The spread of an abnormal growth, especially cancer, from one part of the body to another.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.metastasis - the spreading of a disease (especially cancer) to another part of the bodymetastasis - the spreading of a disease (especially cancer) to another part of the body
pathologic process, pathological process - an organic process occurring as a consequence of disease
Translations

metastasis

[mɪˈtæstəsɪs] N (metastases (pl)) [mɪˈtæstəˈsiːz]metástasis f inv

metastasis

n pl <metastases> → Metastasenbildung f, → Metastasierung f

metastasis

[mɪˈtæstəsɪs] nmetastasi f inv

me·tas·ta·sis

n. metástasis, extensión de un proceso patológico de un foco primario a otra parte del cuerpo a través de los vasos sanguíneos o linfáticos como se observa en algunos tipos de cáncer.

metastasis

n (pl -ses) metástasis f
References in periodicals archive ?
* The M classification is further divided into M1a, M1b, and M1c, based on location and number of metastasis: M1a as intrathoracic metastasis with features including contralateral pulmonary tumor nodules, pleural and pericardial metastatic lesions, M1b for single extrathoracic metastatic lesion in a single organ, and M1c consisting of multiple extrathoracic metastases.
Staging CT scan revealed an irregular lung mass (7.9 x 6.5 x 7 cm) [Figure Id], two hypervascular right renal lesions, an ill-defined left renal metastatic lesion [Figure 1e], a splenic lesion, a right ovarian enhancing hemorrhagic mass, and several intra-axial metastatic lesions to the brain with peri-focal edema, mass effect, and significant midline shift [Figure If].
Fine-needle aspiration cytology of the right thyroid gland performed to differentiate the presence of a metastatic lesion or primary thyroid cancer was compatible with malign cytology related to PTC.
One of them is the lack of a previous diagnosis of MM, which decreased the likelihood of a differential diagnosis of a primary intestinal tumor versus a metastatic lesion from MM.
The clinical records of patients with a history of extrathoracic malignancy, who had FOB to investigate a second primary focus or metastatic lesion after a pulmonary mass was identified on thoracic CT or integrated PET (PET-CT) were reviewed separately.
Image-guided radiotherapy was administered with radiation physicist and physician jointly verifying localization and coverage of each metastatic lesion. All SBRT/IGRT technologies utilized for treatment delivery were performed on Elekta Synergy or infinity radiotherapy treatment delivery systems.
NaF FDG Follow-up Location PET/CT PET/CT positive Skull (except for 3 0 2 skull base) Sternum and ribs 52 17 46 Centrum 89 39 78 Ilium, pubis, and ischia 39 18 31 Limbs (include scapula 25 7 21 and clavicle) Total 208 81 177 Table 3: The proportion of confirmed osseous metastases that were detected by each radiotracer for each type of metastatic lesion. [sup.18]F-NaF [sup.18]F-FDG PET/CT PET/CT Osteoblastic 42/50 18/18 Osteolytic 49/57 27/28 Mixed 22/22 8/8 No obvious abnormality 61/79 23/27 on CT Total 174/208 174/208 Table 4: Measures of diagnostic performance using [sup.18]F-NaF PET/CT or [sup.18]F-FDG PET/CT to detect osseous metastatic lesions of patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma.
However, CT identified no other metastatic lesion, and nephrectomy was performed.
Metastatic cancer of unknown primary (CUP site syndrome) is characterized by the presence of the metastatic lesion without the primitive carcinoma.
If the primary source of the metastatic lesion is unknown, a positron emission tomography (PET) scan or CT scan should be considered.
(13) Surgical resection of a solitary metastatic lesion of RCC has been found to have a 41% survival at 2 years and a 13% survival at 5 years.5 The functional and cosmetic consequences of complete surgical excision need to be weighed heavily prior to surgery.
In patients with a single cutaneous deposit and no evidence of systemic spread, nephrectomy and excision of the metastatic lesion are the treatment of choice.

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