metatheory

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met·a·the·o·ry

 (mĕt′ə-thē′ə-rē, -thîr′ē)
n.
A theory devised to analyze theoretical systems.

metatheory

(ˈmɛtəˌθɪərɪ)
n
1. (Philosophy) philosophical discussion of the foundations, structure, or results of some theory, such as metamathematics
2. a formal system that describes the structure of some other system. See also metalanguage
metatheoretical adj
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References in periodicals archive ?
The author provides an overview about the field of international political economy (IPE) along metatheoretical lines.
These paradigms reflect basic metatheoretical assumptions that underpin the shared philosophy, perspective, mode of theorizing, and approach of researchers who operate within them.
Traditional theoretical perspectives that purport to clarify the dynamics of spiritual bypass and the methods of intervention arising from these theories are explained, with emphasis on the need for metatheoretical approaches.
In the first place, almost all German narratologists feel the need for an explicit metatheoretical component to accompany their work and a philosophical framework to underpin it.
Reworking Gender is a remarkable analysis of the intersections of discourse, gender, and organizing that not only addresses contemporary metatheoretical concerns but also illuminates these issues with archival and interview data.
Part One focuses on metatheoretical questions of environmental ethics, through a debate between pragmatic and "foundationalist" approaches.
As a "metatheoretical" point, it should be said up front that the theory of successful intelligence conceptualizes giftedness in a way that is different from that of some conventional conceptions of giftedness, for example, those who view intelligence as unidimensional (e.g., Jensen, 1998).
identity for metatheoretical reasons, an excellent laboratory so to
Admittedly, Oakley claims only to make metatheoretical suggestions; he is only suggesting, not doing, a reconstruction of economics, but surely he can provide some hint as to the application of this theory.
The editors arrange the contributions around four metatheoretical figures or "tropics of theory" which, they point out, are not exhaustive but heuristic: genealogies, performativities, physiologies and technologies.
Gould observes that Darwinism "embodied several broad commitments (philosophical or metatheoretical in the technical sense of these terms) more characteristic of nineteenth than of twentieth century thought." These Victorian philosophical prejudices include the "designation of a privileged locus of causality, a single direction of causal flow, and a smooth continuity in resulting effects." Gould systematically and unanswerably refutes each of these three essential components of Darwinian logic.
Gindoff (1994) `Agency-Structure, Micro-Macro, Individualism--Holism--Relationism: A Metatheoretical Explanation of Theoretical Convergence between the United States and Europe', pp.