metatheory

(redirected from Metatheoretical)
Also found in: Medical, Encyclopedia.

met·a·the·o·ry

 (mĕt′ə-thē′ə-rē, -thîr′ē)
n.
A theory devised to analyze theoretical systems.

metatheory

(ˈmɛtəˌθɪərɪ)
n
1. (Philosophy) philosophical discussion of the foundations, structure, or results of some theory, such as metamathematics
2. a formal system that describes the structure of some other system. See also metalanguage
metatheoretical adj
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
By treating paradox as a theoretical construct rather than a social phenomenon or an observational object, we offer a metatheoretical perspective that approaches and recognizes diverse ways of knowing cross-culturally as co-existing.
With the rise of scientific thought, that consciousness split, and we were suddenly "simultaneously [aware of] being a body and having a body," a phenomenon that is associated with "the rise of a discursive, metatheoretical 'modernist' orientation to the self that is secular, self-reflexive, and ironic" (Arthur Kleinman, Rethinking Psychiatry: From Cultural Category to Personal Experience [New York: Free Press, 1988], 50).
Furthermore, the work of Robertson (1994), in his metatheoretical treatment of glocalization, has significant explanatory ramifications for the construct.
The logical structure of the social amplification of risk framework (SARF): metatheoretical foundation and policy implications, in N.
Finally, although a critical realist metatheoretical stance offers strong grounds for critiquing work that follows positivist and postmodern-nominalist conventions (which does not mean rejecting insights that such research generates), CR hardly excludes diverse sociological traditions.
Metatheoretical perspectives on sustainability journeys: Evolutionary, relation and durational.
To achieve his metatheoretical goal, Floridi seeks to provide the foundation and background for his ethics.
In the absence of an authoritative metatheoretical argument that can adjudicate this controversy, it seems that cultivating a concrete and palpable fear of nuclear holocaust is not a clear morally responsible course of action.
2000), "Conceptions of Giftedness from a Metatheoretical Perspective," in K.
Whereas leading cognitive therapists acknowledged debts to Kelly (Beck et al, 1979; Ellis, 1977), and some personal construct theorists were also able to see compatibilities between the two approaches (Neimeyer, 1985), others (particularly those whose sympathies were more with humanistic psychology) eschewed any such linkages, largely on the basis of differences at a metatheoretical level.