MRSA

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Related to Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: vancomycin

MRSA

 (mûr′sə)
n.
1. Any of various strains of the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus that are resistant to methicillin and other beta-lactam antibiotics and can cause life-threatening infections. Many strains are also resistant to other classes of antibiotics.
2. An infection caused by one of these strains of bacteria.

[m(ethicillin)-r(esistant) S(taphylococcus) a(ureus).]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

MRSA

abbreviation for
(Microbiology) methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: a bacterium that enters the skin through open wounds to cause septicaemia and is extremely resistant to most antibiotics. It has been responsible for outbreaks of untreatable infections among patients in hospitals
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

MRSA

[ˌɛmɑːrɛsˈeɪ] n abbr (=methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus) → SAMR m(= staphylococcus aureus méticilline résistant)
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

MRSA

abbr of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureusMRSA m (Keim, gegen den die üblichen Antibiotika unwirksam sind)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

MRSA

abbr methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. V. Staphylococcus aureus.
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) detection: Comparison of two molecular methods (IDI-MRSA PCR assay and GenoType MRSA directed PCR assay) with three selective MRSA agars (MRSA ID, MRSASelect, and CHROMagar MRSA) for use with infection-control swabs.
Pulsed field gel electrophoresis as a new epidemiological tool for monitoring methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in an intensive care unit.
Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in community-acquired pyoderma.
The results were released in March 2007 along with guidelines for MRSA management, the Guide to the Elimination of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Transmission in Hospital Settings (22).
NEW FORMS: MRSA, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, is carried by millions.
It is specially designed to bind to the penicillin-resistant targets in Gram-positive cocci, resulting in potent bactericidal activity towards methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae (PRSP).
Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus otorrhea after tympanostomy tube placement: An emerging concern.
Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major cause of nosocomial infectious disease, and it has become a serious problem in hospitals.
ContraFect announced that its manuscript titled "The Antistaphylococcal Lysin, CF-301, Activates Key Host Factors in Human Blood To Potentiate Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Bacteriolysis" was published in the April edition of the peer-reviewed Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy Journal of the American Society of Microbiology.
Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections are recognized across the world equally in advanced and growing countries as a reason of recurrent hospitalizations and persistent infections associated with notable abnormal illness, high death rate and increased treatment costs1.
Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has become endemic today in community hospitals, long-term care facilities, and tertiary care hospitals.
Controlled evaluation of the IDI-MRSA assay for detection of colonization by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in diverse mucocutaneous specimens.