maximum likelihood

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maximum likelihood

n
1. (Statistics) the probability of randomly drawing a given sample from a population maximized over the possible values of the population parameters
2. (Statistics) the non-Bayesian rule that, given an experimental observation, one should utilize as point estimates of parameters of a distribution those values which give the highest conditional probability to that observation, irrespective of the prior probability assigned to the parameters
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The estimation of the parameters of model was done by using method of Maximum Likelihood.
This paper uses the method of maximum likelihood to estimate the parameters.
However, the operational risk literature reports that attempts to fit operational losses using truncated severity distributions by the method of maximum likelihood estimation are not always successful.
The parameters of the logit model were estimated using the method of maximum likelihood, and the significance of the coefficients of the model was evaluated using the Wald test (Everitt, Hothorn 2011; McCullagh, Nelder 1989).
The parameters of the logit model are determined by the method of maximum likelihood.
Estimation of Population Mean by Method of Maximum Likelihood
The method of maximum likelihood chooses as estimates those values of the parameters that are most consistent with the sample data.
Where single factor segregations fit the expected segregation ratio the method of maximum likelihood was used to estimate recombination (Mather, 1951; Allard, 1956).
Nevertheless, much of the book requires substantial statistical background -- such as familiarity with the method of maximum likelihood, Bayesian estimation, and some of the niceties of modern statistical computation.
One approach to obtaining such estimates is the method of maximum likelihood.
The two methods usually employed for estimating m and k are the method of moments and the method of maximum likelihood.
This book takes a fresh look at the popular and well-established method of maximum likelihood for statistical estimation and inference.

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