Methodism


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Related to Methodism: John Wesley, Presbyterianism

Meth·od·ism

 (mĕth′ə-dĭz′əm)
n.
1. The beliefs, worship, and system of organization of the Methodists.
2. methodism Emphasis on systematic procedure.

Methodism

(ˈmɛθədɪzəm)
n
(Protestantism) the system and practices of the Methodist Church, developed by John Wesley and his followers

Meth•od•ism

(ˈmɛθ əˌdɪz əm)

n.
the doctrines, polity, beliefs, and methods of worship of the Methodists.
[1730–40]

Methodism

1. the religious teachings and church polity of John Wesley, 18th-century English theologian and evangelist, or those of his followers.
2. the doctrines, polity, beliefs, and rituals of the Methodist Church, founded by Wesley, especially its emphasis on personal and social morality. Also called Wesleyanism. — Methodist, n., adj.
See also: Protestantism
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Methodism - the religious beliefs and practices of Methodists characterized by concern with social welfare and public moralsMethodism - the religious beliefs and practices of Methodists characterized by concern with social welfare and public morals
Protestantism - the theological system of any of the churches of western Christendom that separated from the Roman Catholic Church during the Reformation
Translations

Methodism

[ˈmeθədɪzəm] Nmetodismo m

Methodism

[ˈmɛθədɪzəm] nméthodisme m

Methodism

nMethodismus m

Methodism

[ˈmɛθədɪzm] nmetodismo
References in classic literature ?
He had purchased the post of lieutenant of dragoons, and afterwards came to be a captain; but having quarrelled with his colonel, was by his interest obliged to sell; from which time he had entirely rusticated himself, had betaken himself to studying the Scriptures, and was not a little suspected of an inclination to methodism.
"Shut up, you black cuss!" roared Legree; "did ye think I wanted any o' yer infernal old Methodism? I say, tune up, now, something real rowdy,--quick!"
Rann was inwardly maintaining the dignity of the Church in the face of this scandalous irruption of Methodism, and as that dignity was bound up with his own sonorous utterance of the responses, his argument naturally suggested a quotation from the psalm he had read the last Sunday afternoon.
He was an open-minded man, but given to indirect modes of expressing himself: when he was disappointed in a market for his silk braids, he swore at the groom; when his brother-in-law Bulstrode had vexed him, he made cutting remarks on Methodism; and it was now apparent that he regarded Fred's idleness with a sudden increase of severity, by his throwing an embroidered cap out of the smoking-room on to the hall-floor.
Off he packed the Methodists, one fine day, exiled several hundred of his people to Samoa for sticking to Methodism, and, of all things, invented a religion of his own, with himself the figure-head of worship.
An institution is the lengthened shadow of one man; as, Monachism, of the Hermit Antony; the Reformation, of Luther; Quakerism, of Fox; Methodism, of Wesley; Abolition, of Clarkson.
Banks and tariffs, the newspaper and caucus, Methodism and Unitarianism, are flat and dull to dull people, but rest on the same foundations of wonder as the town of Troy and the temple of Delphi, and are as swiftly passing away.
Thompson's footsteps in other respects, have not followed up on his early recognition of the potential significance of religion to working-class culture." Most of us are not interested in remembering The Making of the English Working Class as a big book about Methodism.
His first book, however, was Up from Methodism (1926).
These days the leadership of our beloved Labour party is in the hands of those who have more in common with Marxism than Methodism.
The first record of Methodism in the Elland area was in June 1761 when the first preaching house was established in a farm house.
The Poisoned Chalice: Eucharistic Grape Juice and Common-Sense Realism in Victorian Methodism. By Jennifer L.