matronymic

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mat·ro·nym·ic

 (măt′rə-nĭm′ĭk) also me·tro·nym·ic (mē′trə-, mĕt′rə-)
adj.
Of, relating to, or derived from the name of one's mother or maternal ancestor.
n.
A name so derived.

[Greek mātrōnumikos, dialectal variant of mētrōnumikos : mētēr, mētr-, mother; see metro- + onuma, name; see nō̆-men- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

matronymic

(ˌmætrəˈnɪmɪk)
adj, n
a less common word for metronymic
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mat•ro•nym•ic

(ˌmæ trəˈnɪm ɪk)

adj.
1. derived from the name of a mother or other female ancestor.
n.
2. a matronymic name.
[1785–95; alter. of metronymic, by influence of patronymicand matri-]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

metronymic, matronymic

a name derived from a mother or a female ancestor. Cf. patronymic.
See also: Names
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.matronymic - a name derived from the name of your mother or a maternal ancestormatronymic - a name derived from the name of your mother or a maternal ancestor
name - a language unit by which a person or thing is known; "his name really is George Washington"; "those are two names for the same thing"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
That said, he examines such aspects of medieval personal names in the region as patronyms and metronyms with -son, The North as a mosaic, occupational bynames, topographies, and early-modern comparisons.
We dwell in the dominion of truth and are marshalling our armies of metronyms and anthropomorphisms into our future work."