Mexican American


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Mexican American

n.
A US citizen or resident of Mexican ancestry.

Mex′i·can-A·mer′i·can adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Synopsis: With "Chicano Homeland: The Movement in East Los Angeles for Mexican American Power, Justice, and Equality", Louis R.
Telles, the first Mexican American mayor in the US and the first Mexican American US ambassador.
By the time of the Vietnam War era, the "Mexican American Generation" had made tremendous progress both socially and politically.
The panel has collectively come to the conclusion to not recommend the adoption of The Mexican American Studies Toolkit as it stands," the panel wrote.
Rather than limiting his focus to recent events, Vargas takes a broad approach in explaining the struggles and histories that create the Mexican American experience.
The Texas State Board of Education rejected Mexican American Heritage including an ethnic studies textbook in the state high school curriculum after academics said the book contained stereotypes and errors that were offensive to Hispanic Americans.
Of the 50 million students enrolled in elementary and secondary schools in the United States, 8 million are Mexican American. This is not surprising to those abreast of population trends given that Mexican Americans have become one of the fastest growing demographic groups in the United States.
Foley's work is at its best when it takes a break from the fast-paced chronology to closely examine how an ever emerging Mexican American population negotiated, for example, their blunt categorization in the US census as alternatingly "white" and "non-white" subjects.
From Coveralls to Zoot Suits: The Lives of Mexican American Women on the World War II Home Front.
Sanchez, Becoming Mexican American: Ethnicity, Culture, and Identity in Chicano Los Angeles, 1900-1945 (New York: Oxford University Press, 1993).

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