Mexican Spanish


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Mexican Spanish

n.
The Spanish language as used in Mexico.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Mex′ican Span′ish


n.
Spanish as used in Mexico. Abbr.: MexSp
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Mexican Spanish - the dialect of Spanish spoken in MexicoMexican Spanish - the dialect of Spanish spoken in Mexico
Spanish - the Romance language spoken in most of Spain and the countries colonized by Spain
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
22 KRZZ Regional Mexican Spanish Broadcasting System, 1.7 and a tie with KUFX Classic Rock Entercom, 1.7.
For the 2010 conference (Clegg 2010) I went into fine detail on the frequencies of the verb tenses used in Southwest Spanish as compared to Popular Mexican Spanish. The results indicated that speakers of Southwest Spanish use the same verb tenses and persons at the same frequencies as Popular Mexican Spanish.
This paper is structured as follows: in Section 2 the details of the Mexican Spanish emotional speech corpus (selection of emotional states, stimuli vocabulary, speech recording, phonetic and orthographic labelling, and acoustic features) are presented.
For most English-language Chicano novels, a Mexican-dialectical translation (or one more proximate to Mexican Spanish) will better communicate the sound and sensibility of the author's initial portrayal of a Chicano environment; a different Spanish-language dialect has the potential to distort or misconstrue these important "signifier[s] of difference in a U.S.
Televisa International gives its clients the audio materials in their original Mexican Spanish and, depending on the client's preference, it is then dubbed or subtitled.
They focus on Mexican Spanish and cover basic pharmacy vocabulary, how to counsel on a variety of medication formulations, questions for common self-care problems and disease states, key phrases and vocabulary for physical assessment commonly used by pharmacists, dialogues, and cultural advice.
For instance, as Leary points out, Cuban Spanish, Mexican Spanish and Iberian Spanish each have their own unique cultural expressions, dialects and colloquialisms.
One falls like a block (Dutch), steps on a crazy stone (Croatian), falls on one's buttocks (Mexican Spanish), dives headfirst (Norwegian), is intoxicated (Indonesian), is swallowed like a postman's sock (Spanish), or is hit by a blind Sunday (Bulgarian).
Combining a functional and cognitive approach to grammar, this article explores the ways in which men and women use the optional pronominal form of the Spanish verb salire(se) 'to leave' in Mexican Spanish. Women were found to use the pronominal form notably more than men, and that, diachronically, this form has traditionally been applied to women's behaviour.