Mexican War


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Related to Mexican War: Spanish American war

Mexican War

n.
A war (1846-1848) between the United States and Mexico, resulting in the cession by Mexico of lands now constituting all or most of the states of California, Arizona, New Mexico, Nevada, Utah, and Colorado.

Mexican War

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the war fought between the US and Mexico (1846–48), through which the US acquired the present-day Southwest

Mex′ican War′


n.
the war between the U.S. and Mexico, 1846–48.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Mexican War - after disputes over Texas lands that were settled by Mexicans the United States declared war on Mexico in 1846 and by treaty in 1848 took Texas and California and Arizona and New Mexico and Nevada and Utah and part of Colorado and paid Mexico $15,000,000Mexican War - after disputes over Texas lands that were settled by Mexicans the United States declared war on Mexico in 1846 and by treaty in 1848 took Texas and California and Arizona and New Mexico and Nevada and Utah and part of Colorado and paid Mexico $15,000,000
Buena Vista - a pitched battle in the Mexican War in 1847; United States forces under Zachary Taylor defeated the Mexican forces under Santa Anna at a locality in northern Mexico
Chapultepec - a pitched battle in the Mexican War that resulted in a major victory for American forces over Mexican forces at a locality south of Mexico City (1847)
References in classic literature ?
Witness the present Mexican war, the work of comparatively a few individuals using the standing government as their tool; for, in the outset, the people would not have consented to this measure.
In this same year Henry Clay delivered his memorable speech on the Mexican War, at Lexington, Kentucky, and it was telegraphed to The New York Herald at a cost of five hundred dollars, thus breaking all previous records for news-gathering enterprise.
Witness the present Mexican war, the work of comparatively a few individuals using the standing government as their tool; for in the outset, the people would not have consented to this measure.
While fully recognizing the historical linkage, he manages to isolate the Mexican War, to give it its own identity as a distinct chapter in American military history.
His 1849 essay, "Civil Disobedience," following his one-night stay in jail for refusal to pay tax for the Mexican War (which he felt would extend slavery), gained him worldwide fame and inspired later generations of social activists, including Gandhi, Martin Luther King, Jr., and John F.
He believes in localism, decentralization, and a minimalist state pursuing a neutral foreign policy, His text suggests that, if he could do American history over again, he would reject the Constitution and stick with the Articles of Confederation, let the South secede in 1861, and stay out of all wars, except the War for Independence and maybe the Mexican War.
He began his study of law in his father's office but left to recruit volunteers for the Mexican War, in which he served from 1846 to 1847.
The Mexican War came to an end with the Treaty of Guadelupe-Hidalgo on February 2, 1848.
At the close of the Mexican War (1846-48), violent debate broke out in Congress on whether the newly annexed territories would be slave or free.
A graduate of West Point and a veteran of the Mexican War, Grant later engaged unsuccessfully in farming and business.
Covering the period between the War of 1812 and the Mexican War, this sequel to the author's Jackson's Sword describes the Army Officer Corps's role in the expansion of US control in the Southwest.
The description on the dust jacket makes the claim that "in time, the fierce national collision set off by Jackson's Indian policy would encompass the Mexican War, the bloody frontier wars over the expansion of slavery, the doctrines of nullification and secession, and finally, the Civil War itself." Yet Langguth mentions this line of reasoning just twice in the narrative, and that only in passing, when he describes the removal debate as "the nation's first civil war," which he says the South won, and again in one of the book's concluding paragraphs, where he observes that the South lost the real Civil War of the 1860s (158).