Mexican stand-off


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Mex′ican stand′-off`


n.
usage: This term, though not used as a deliberate slur, is still sometimes felt to be insulting to Mexicans.
n.
Informal: Sometimes Offensive. a confrontation that neither side can win; stalemate or impasse.
[1890–95]
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References in periodicals archive ?
It's no secret that there has been growing frustration - and, frankly, anger - with the Westminster stand-off in recent times, and This Brexit version of a Mexican stand-off has chipped away at the UK's reputation for stability, pragmatism and reliability.
And if he receives those assurances, then all may not be lost as the club owner has blinked first following a Mexican stand-off between the duo over transfer policy during the window.
DAY 24 of Toddler-in-Chief Donald Trump refusing to pay 800,000 Americans in a Mexican stand-off, with the White House man-baby's wall tantrum is costing the US President support.
It is what Taylor refers to as a "Mexican stand-off" (p.
A SCOTS country band have ended their Mexican stand-off with Tabasco.
Now I get that sometimes clubs differ in their valuations of players and very often it becomes a sort of Mexican stand-off until the last day or so of the transfer window but of course then you run the risk of losing out on the players you want!
"I think the instinct of the Welsh Government is not to go into a big Mexican stand-off with the UK government on this stuff but because the UK government has basically given nothing, Carwyn Jones is in a position where he either puts up or shuts up."
Earlier this month, Tesco and Unilever were locked in a high-profile Mexican stand-off over a potential 10% price hike on products including Marmite and Persil, linked to the collapse in sterling.
The impact of sterling's fall came into sharp focus last week when Tesco and Unilever became locked in a Mexican stand-off over a potential price hike on key products.
The Tory leadership contest is increasingly resembling the invariable Mexican stand-off at the end of a Quentin Tarantino film.
But the scenes with the increasingly frayed theatrical characters are less satisfying - they have their own fears and aspirations, but never really gain our sympathy, while the final Mexican stand-off between the two sides reaches an uneasy resolution at best.