microstate

(redirected from Micro-state)
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mi·cro·state

 (mī′krō-stāt′)
n.
An independent country that is very small in area and population. Also called ministate.

microstate

(ˈmaɪkrəʊˌsteɪt)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a very small nation that is an internationally-recognized sovereign state. Also called: mini-state

min•i•state

(ˈmɪn iˌsteɪt)

n.
a small, independent nation.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The micro-state on the isolated archipelago doesn't have the means to battle the advancing sea.
What's the closest city to the landlocked micro-state of San Marino - Rimini, Florence or Bologna?
Telecom Italia (TIM) will be signing a deal with the Republic of San Marino for testing 5G technology ahead of a commercial launch of the network across the micro-state by the end of 2018.
Reagan formalized diplomatic relations with the religious micro-state in 1984.
But the best motivation of all for the micro-state of 33,000 people is given by former Juventus and San Marino midfielder Massimo Bonnini, who said: "Playing international football is a good advert for tourism in our country.
Below is a quote from the Independent article: "Since 2011, PSG, the only professional football club in Paris, have been the tool - not the plaything - of a hyper-rich micro-state with tentacular ambitions.
80) There is no precise definition of a micro-state, although it is usually considered to have a population of less than three million people.
Fiji is a micro-state on the world stage, and the indigenous Fijian and Indo-Fijian numbers (not to mention Rotuman) that comprise the bulk of society in Fiji are very small in actual fact.
Zionist Israel is a revolutionary micro-state whose existence has permeated the world with universal morality.
But, having been whittled down to a micro-state, she will barely be able to take care of herself and her people.
They invoked that clause on Monday despite concerns by Caribbean nations, the Commonwealth and the US that their micro-state could be victimised by global trade currents and drug cartels.
It incorporates this assumption into a simple one-sector economic model of a micro-state that has antecedents in the work of Corden (1984) and Treadgold (1992).