microorganism

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mi·cro·or·gan·ism

 (mī′krō-ôr′gə-nĭz′əm)
n.
An organism or infectious agent of microscopic or submicroscopic size, especially a bacterium or protozoan.

microorganism

(ˌmaɪkrəʊˈɔːɡəˌnɪzəm)
n
(Microbiology) any organism, such as a bacterium, protozoan, or virus, of microscopic size

mi•cro•or•gan•ism

(ˌmaɪ kroʊˈɔr gəˌnɪz əm)

n.
any organism too small to be viewed by the unaided eye, as bacteria or some fungi and algae.
[1875–80]
mi`cro•or•gan′ic
(-ɔrˈgæn ɪk)
adj.

mi·cro·or·gan·ism

(mī′krō-ôr′gə-nĭz′əm)
An organism that can be seen only with the aid of a microscope. Microorganisms include bacteria, protozoans, algae, and fungi. See Note at germ.

microorganism

any one of a large variety of microscopic or ultramicroscopic organisms, as bacteria, viruses, etc.
See also: Organisms
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.microorganism - any organism of microscopic sizemicroorganism - any organism of microscopic size  
organism, being - a living thing that has (or can develop) the ability to act or function independently
animal, animate being, beast, creature, fauna, brute - a living organism characterized by voluntary movement
plant life, flora, plant - (botany) a living organism lacking the power of locomotion
monad - (biology) a single-celled microorganism (especially a flagellate protozoan)
intestinal flora - harmless microorganisms (as Escherichia coli) that inhabit the intestinal tract and are essential for its normal functioning
virus - (virology) ultramicroscopic infectious agent that replicates itself only within cells of living hosts; many are pathogenic; a piece of nucleic acid (DNA or RNA) wrapped in a thin coat of protein
moneran, moneron - organisms that typically reproduce by asexual budding or fission and whose nutritional mode is absorption or photosynthesis or chemosynthesis
bacteria, bacterium - (microbiology) single-celled or noncellular spherical or spiral or rod-shaped organisms lacking chlorophyll that reproduce by fission; important as pathogens and for biochemical properties; taxonomy is difficult; often considered to be plants
microbe, germ, bug - a minute life form (especially a disease-causing bacterium); the term is not in technical use
pathogen - any disease-producing agent (especially a virus or bacterium or other microorganism)
protoctist - any of the unicellular protists
protist, protistan - free-living or colonial organisms with diverse nutritional and reproductive modes
pilus - hairlike structure especially on the surface of a cell or microorganism
virulence, virulency - extreme harmfulness (as the capacity of a microorganism to cause disease); "the virulence of the plague"
transmitter, vector - any agent (person or animal or microorganism) that carries and transmits a disease; "mosquitos are vectors of malaria and yellow fever"; "fleas are vectors of the plague"; "aphids are transmitters of plant diseases"; "when medical scientists talk about vectors they are usually talking about insects"
microflora - microscopic plants; bacteria are often considered to be microflora
bacteremia, bacteriaemia, bacteriemia - transient presence of bacteria (or other microorganisms) in the blood

microorganism

also micro-organism
noun
A minute organism usually producing disease:
Translations
mikroorganismus
mikroorganisme
mikro-organismi
מיקרואורגניזם
mikroorganizam
mikroorganisme
微生物

microorganism

[ˈmaɪkrəʊˈɔːgənɪzəm] Nmicroorganismo m

microorganism

[ˌmaɪkrəʊˈɔːgəˌnɪzm] nmicroorganismo

mi·cro·or·gan·ism

n. microorganismo, organismo que no puede verse a simple vista.

microorganism

n microorganismo, microbio
References in periodicals archive ?
(2010) Patenting of microorganisms .indlaw.com, 15 May, http://students.indlaw.com/ display.aspx?4631, accessed 22 April 2010.
Probiotics are live microorganisms that, when ingested, have a beneficial effect on intestinal function by promoting improved intestinal microflora balance.
Purpose: To identify, the specific microorganisms responsible for infection associated with vascular access in patients undergoing hemodialysis; to determine the potential role of oral/dental procedures in causing infection associated with vascular access in these patients.
Evonik Degussa GmbH (Essen, Germany) has patented a process for the preparation of L-amino acids by the fermentation of recombinant microorganisms of the family Enterobacteriaceae.
Major current food safety issues encompass the need to control traditional as well as emerging pathogenic microorganisms. These include microorganisms of increased virulence at low infectious doses or those resistant to antibiotics or food-related stresses.
The effect of minimum inhibitory concentrations of the gels on the adherence of these microorganisms to glass was assessed in the presence of 5% sucrose, using increasing and doubled concentrations of the diluted solution of the gels ranging from 1:1 to 1:1024.
But recent discoveries suggest that microorganisms can fuel their metabolisms by taking advantage of the chemical energy stored in various minerals, including those that make up the ocean crust.
Byotrol then conditions the surfaces before additional microorganisms land, making it more difficult for the micro-organisms to settle on the surface, attach and reproduce.
ENVIRONMENTAL health officers have been asked to assess the suitability of a new streamlined European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) system checking whether microorganisms used in food are harmful.
Organic substances "biodegrade" when they are broken down by microorganisms into their constituent parts, and in turn recycled by nature.
Of special note are 2 chapters that are often missing in traditional medical microbiology books: 1 describes how long-term experimental evolutionary studies in the laboratory can contribute to our understanding of microbial pathogen evolution in the environment and clinics, and the other describes how gene inactivation and gene loss can be creative forces during the evolution of many microorganisms, especially obligate intracellular pathogens.
Chapters discuss basic microbiology and microorganisms, how to control their growth and activities, cleanroom facilities and personnel controls, and the detection and enumeration of microorganisms in the cleanroom.