microscope

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mi·cro·scope

 (mī′krə-skōp′)
n.
1. An optical instrument that uses a lens or a combination of lenses to produce magnified images of small objects, especially of objects too small to be seen by the unaided eye.
2. An instrument, such as an electron microscope, that uses electronic or other processes to magnify objects.

[Italian microscopio or New Latin mīcroscopium (Italian, from New Latin); see Microscopium.]

microscope

(ˈmaɪkrəˌskəʊp)
n
1. (General Physics) an optical instrument that uses a lens or combination of lenses to produce a magnified image of a small, close object. Modern optical microscopes have magnifications of about 1500 to 2000. See also simple microscope, compound microscope, ultramicroscope
2. (General Physics) any instrument, such as the electron microscope, for producing a magnified visual image of a small object

mi•cro•scope

(ˈmaɪ krəˌskoʊp)

n.
1. an optical instrument having a magnifying lens or a combination of lenses for inspecting objects too small to be seen distinctly by the unaided eye.
2. any of various high-powered magnifying devices, as the electron microscope.
[1650–60; < New Latin mīcroscopium. See micro-, -scope]

mi·cro·scope

(mī′krə-skōp′)
An instrument used to magnify objects that are hard to see or invisible to the naked eye. Optical microscopes consist of a lens or combination of lenses. Others, such as the electron microscope, use other means of magnification, such as beams of electrons.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.microscope - magnifier of the image of small objectsmicroscope - magnifier of the image of small objects; "the invention of the microscope led to the discovery of the cell"
angioscope - a modified microscope used to study capillary vessels
camera lucida - an optical device consisting of an attachment that enables an observer to view simultaneously the image and a drawing surface for sketching it
electron microscope - a microscope that is similar in purpose to a light microscope but achieves much greater resolving power by using a parallel beam of electrons to illuminate the object instead of a beam of light
light microscope - microscope consisting of an optical instrument that magnifies the image of an object
magnifier - a scientific instrument that magnifies an image
Translations
مِكروسكوب: مِجْهَرمَيكْرُوسْكُوب
mikroskop
mikroskop
mikroskopo
mikroskooppi
खुर्दबीन
mikroskopsitnozor
mikroszkóp
smásjá
顕微鏡
현미경
mikroskopasmikroskopinismikroskopiškaimikroskopiškas
mikroskops
mikroskop
mikroskop
mikroskop
กล้องจุลทรรศน์
мікроскоп
kính hiển vi

microscope

[ˈmaɪkrəskəʊp] Nmicroscopio m

microscope

[ˈmaɪkrəskəʊp] nmicroscope m
under the microscope → au microscope
to put sth under the microscope (fig) (= scrutinize) → examiner qch au microscope

microscope

[ˈmaɪkrəskəʊp] nmicroscopio
light microscope → microscopio ottico
electron microscope → microscopio elettronico
under the microscope → al microscopio

microscope

(ˈmaikrəskəup) noun
an instrument which makes very small objects able to be seen magnifying them greatly. Germs are very small, and can only be seen with the aid of a microscope.
ˌmicroˈscopic (-ˈsko-) adjective
seen only by the aid of a microscope. microscopic bacteria.
ˌmicroˈscopically adverb

microscope

مَيكْرُوسْكُوب mikroskop mikroskop Mikroskop μικροσκόπιο microscopio mikroskooppi microscope mikroskop microscopio 顕微鏡 현미경 microscoop mikroskop mikroskop microscópio микроскоп mikroskop กล้องจุลทรรศน์ mikroskop kính hiển vi 显微镜

mi·cro·scope

n. microscopio, instrumento óptico con lentes que amplifican objetos que no pueden verse a simple vista;
electron ______ electrónico;
light ______ con luz o lumínico.

microscope

n microscopio; electron — microscopio electrónico; light — microscopio de luz
References in classic literature ?
The surgeons swarmed around with their probes in their hands, and applied their microscopes to the whole area of M.
Even idleness is eager now--eager for amusement; prone to excursion-trains, art museums, periodical literature, and exciting novels; prone even to scientific theorizing and cursory peeps through microscopes.
The appearances of a piece of matter from different places change partly according to intrinsic laws (the laws of perspective, in the case of visual shape), partly according to the nature of the intervening medium--fog, blue spectacles, telescopes, microscopes, sense-organs, etc.
Challenger sat at the centre table with the electric light illuminating the slide under the microscope which he had brought from his dressing room.
No one would have believed in the last years of the nineteenth century that this world was being watched keenly and closely by intelligences greater than man's and yet as mortal as his own; that as men busied themselves about their various concerns they were scrutinised and studied, perhaps almost as narrowly as a man with a microscope might scru- tinise the transient creatures that swarm and multiply in a drop of water.
When the novelty of this was exhausted they again seized him, but he now produced a small microscope.
He stayed, however, in apparent contentment for six days, playing with a microscope and a notebook in one of the many sparsely furnished sitting-rooms, but on the evening of the seventh day, as they sat at dinner, he appeared more restless than usual.
I could see distinctly the limbs of these vermin with my naked eye, much better than those of a European louse through a microscope, and their snouts with which they rooted like swine.
19] The cavities leading from the fleshy compartments of the extremity, were filled with a yellow pulpy matter, which, examined under a microscope, presented an extraordinary appearance.
I was all tuckered out tryin' to mislead 'em and deceive 'em and sidetrack 'em; but the minute I got where I wa'n't put under a microscope by day an' a telescope by night and had myself TO myself without sayin' `By your leave,' I begun to pick up.
He owes me seven pounds at the moment, and he pawned his microscope last week, because he was so broke.
The modern masters promise very little; they know that metals cannot be transmuted and that the elixir of life is a chimera but these philosophers, whose hands seem only made to dabble in dirt, and their eyes to pore over the microscope or crucible, have indeed performed miracles.