cosmic microwave background radiation

(redirected from Microwave background radiation)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Acronyms, Encyclopedia.
Related to Microwave background radiation: cosmic microwave background

cosmic microwave background radiation

n.
Microwave radiation that penetrates space throughout the universe, postulated to be residual electromagnetic radiation originally emitted by warm matter in the universe approximately 400,000 years after the Big Bang. Also called cosmic background radiation, cosmic microwave background, microwave background.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cosmic microwave background radiation - (cosmology) the cooled remnant of the hot big bang that fills the entire universe and can be observed today with an average temperature of about 2.725 kelvin
cosmogeny, cosmogony, cosmology - the branch of astrophysics that studies the origin and evolution and structure of the universe
cosmic radiation - radiation coming from outside the solar system
References in periodicals archive ?
The Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation was discovered by accident in 1965 by two Bell Laboratory scientists, Arno Penzias and Robert Wilson, as they tracked down sources of radio interference.
Could it be that these vaunted microwave background radiation fluctuations from the cosmos are in reality catoptric (mirror-like) images reflected off galaxy and galactic supercluster structures under the pretense of inflationary anisotropy?
This is due in part to the scarcity of events that can accelerate particles to such enormous energies, and partly because these particles lose energy when they collide with the ever-present cosmic microwave background radiation.
As predicted by theory, the initial explosion left an afterglow of radiation throughout the sky, the microwave background radiation, which was detected in 1965.
Rashid Sunyaev, 68, an astrophysicist and contributor to high-energy astronomy who proposed the theory that fluctuations in cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) may be used to explore the expanding universe.
The mass determination used three independent methods: a measurement of the mass needed to confine the hot X-ray emitting gas to the cluster, the imprint of the cluster's gaseous mass on the cosmic microwave background radiation, and the observed distortions in the shapes of galaxies behind the cluster, which are caused by the bending of light from the galaxies by the gravity of the cluster.
Caption: Patterns in the cosmic microwave background radiation (coloring shows temperature differences) provide clues to how matter was distributed when the cosmos was young, allowing scientists to infer properties of the universe.
Since then, a series of astrophysical and cosmological measurements, from observations of light bending around distant galaxy clusters to studies of the microwave background radiation left over from the big bang, all confirm that most of the matter in the universe is dark.
In the subsequent section, we also discuss plausible extension of this unified statistics to include anisotropic effect by using quaternion oscillator, which may be observed in the context of Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation.
This afterglow is called cosmic microwave background radiation.
The glow, called cosmic microwave background radiation, carried an imprint of large waves to the detectors on Earth.
Sunyaev, 68, a citizen of both Russia and Germany, will receive the award fordeveloping the theory that fluctuations in cosmic microwave background radiation can be used as a means of exploring the expanding universe, and for his outstanding contributions to the field of high-energy astronomy.

Full browser ?