Assyria

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Related to Middle Assyrian period: Old Assyria, Old Assyrian Empire, Old Assyrian period

As·syr·i·a

 (ə-sîr′ē-ə)
An ancient empire and civilization of western Asia in the upper valley of the Tigris River. In its zenith between the ninth and seventh centuries bc, the empire included all of Mesopotamia and the Levant.

Assyria

(əˈsɪrɪə)
n
1. (Placename) an ancient kingdom of N Mesopotamia: it established an empire that stretched from Egypt to the Persian Gulf, reaching its greatest extent between 721 and 633 bc. Its chief cities were Assur and Nineveh
2. (Historical Terms) an ancient kingdom of N Mesopotamia: it established an empire that stretched from Egypt to the Persian Gulf, reaching its greatest extent between 721 and 633 bc. Its chief cities were Assur and Nineveh

As•syr•i•a

(əˈsɪər i ə)

n.
an ancient kingdom and empire of SW Asia, centered in N Mesopotamia: greatest extent from c750 to 612 b.c.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Assyria - an ancient kingdom in northern Mesopotamia which is in present-day IraqAssyria - an ancient kingdom in northern Mesopotamia which is in present-day Iraq
Al-Iraq, Irak, Iraq, Republic of Iraq - a republic in the Middle East in western Asia; the ancient civilization of Mesopotamia was in the area now known as Iraq
Mesopotamia - the land between the Tigris and Euphrates; site of several ancient civilizations; part of what is now known as Iraq
Assur, Asur, Ashur - an ancient Assyrian city on the Tigris and traditional capital of Assyria; just to the south of the modern city of Mosul in Iraq
Nineveh - an ancient Assyrian city on the Tigris across from the modern city of Mosul in the northern part of what is now known as Iraq
Ashir, Ashur - chief god of the Assyrians; god of military prowess and empire; identified with Babylonian Anshar
Ishtar, Mylitta - Babylonian and Assyrian goddess of love and fertility and war; counterpart to the Phoenician Astarte
Nusku - god of fire and light; corresponds to Babylonian Girru
Ramman - god of storms and wind; corresponds to Babylonian Adad
Shamash - the chief sun god; drives away winter and storms and brightens the earth with greenery; drives away evil and brings justice and compassion
Translations
آشور
آشور
Asirija
Asur

Assyria

[əˈsɪrɪə] NAsiria f

Assyria

nAssyrien nt
References in periodicals archive ?
Yet it is ironic that despite the richness of the material and the thoroughness with which it is presented, art historians are no closer to understanding the transition from the Middle Assyrian period to the earliest centuries of the Neo-Assyrian period, for which so little evidence has been recovered.
Indeed, the image of a celestial winged horse only appears in Mesopotamia in the Middle Assyrian Period around 1200 BC.
A 30 cm statue of a man on top of a camel, and a number of coins and clay pieces were also unearthed in the site, added al-Haiyou.The Syrian-Spanish archeological mission working in the site of Tell Qaber Abu al-Atiq (hill), 75 km north of Deir Ezzor, found a collection of cuneiforms dating back to the Middle Assyrian period. The city of Dura Europos was founded around 300 BC by the Seleucids in the Hellenistic era and was discovered accidentally in 1920.
The existence of testaments did not prevent these long processes of settlement, because the testaments mostly functioned to assign property to the surviving widow and any unmarried daughters, a tradition that continued into the Middle Assyrian period (e.g., MARV 8 47; Tell Rimah 2037).
To presume that individuals in the Middle Assyrian period are Urartians because Haldis name is an element of their otherwise Akkadian names is simply making too many jumps.

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