Middle English


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Middle English

n.
The English language from about 1100 to 1500.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Middle English

n
(Languages) the English language from about 1100 to about 1450: main dialects are Kentish, Southwestern (West Saxon), East Midland (which replaced West Saxon as the chief literary form and developed into Modern English), West Midland, and Northern (from which the Scots of Lowland Scotland and other modern dialects developed). Abbreviation: ME Compare Old English, Modern English
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Mid′dle Eng′lish


n.
the English language of the period c1150–c1475. Abbr.: ME
[1830–40]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Middle English - English from about 1100 to 1450Middle English - English from about 1100 to 1450  
English, English language - an Indo-European language belonging to the West Germanic branch; the official language of Britain and the United States and most of the commonwealth countries
East Midland - the dialect of Middle English that replaced West Saxon as the literary language and which developed into Modern English
West Midland - a dialect of Middle English
Northern - a dialect of Middle English that developed into Scottish Lallans
Kentish - a dialect of Middle English
Southwestern, West Saxon - a dialect of Middle English
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
moyen anglais
inglês médio
References in periodicals archive ?
Yet another interesting observation is that the use of some types of prepositions and adverbs meaning 'between' in many Lydgate's works stays unnoticed by the Middle English Dictionary online.
Only one copy is known of the mid-15th-century Middle English translation of Giovanni Boccaccio's Latin prose work on famous women, and the last edition of it was published in 1924, says Cowen, without the benefit of many modern references on Middle English.
We next turn north with Emily Wingfield's "Lancelot of the Laik and the Literary Manuscript Miscellany in 15th- and 16th-century Scotland." In this survey, Wingfield shows that Scottish manuscripts of this period used Middle English materials liberally, rarely employed French or Latin, and tended towards the secular rather than the religious.
Recent interest in the emotions among scholars of Middle English has tended to put medieval and modern modes of thought side by side.
Radulescu suggests that Middle English romances' resistance to any kind of definition and categorization goes back to their French antecedents, which are themselves derived from different genres.
The language of the Middle English annals in the Peterborough Chronicle, however, is not far removed from Old English, and a particular example of adverbial over in this text is perhaps best interpreted to mean "in addition." In the much-anthologized entry for the year 1137, describing the Anarchy under the reign of King Stephen, the chronicler offers a harrowing account of the torments devised by the powerful to extort valuables from anyone of even slender means, and how the barons taxed, plundered, and burned the towns.
The 'Heege' manuscript (so called after its principal scribe) is a collection of largely Middle English texts, mainly in verse.
All three types of language preserved in The Owl and the Nightingale - J, C1, and C2 - display evidence of the voicing of initial [f] in words of native origin.(18) In common with the usage of many scribes writing early Middle English, the language of the C text, especially that of C1, also occasionally shows orthographic equivalence of the symbols w, v, u, and p, which may be used interchangeably for [w], [v], and [u].(19) The litteral substitution which is important for the reading in question is w or p for [v] from Old English initial 'f'.
In particular, they argue that the metre of early Middle English poems of the thirteenth century--paradigmatically represented by La3amon's Brut--constitutes the intermediate evolutionary stage between classical Old English and fourteenth-century alliterative versification.
For nearly twenty years, William Marx has been a general editor of 'Middle English Texts' (Medieval Institute Publications, Western Michigan University), a series for which several of the contributors to this Festschrift, whose title is self-explanatory, have edited volumes.
Within this larger objective, Reconstructing Alliterative Verse has two basic aims: first, to situate recent metrical scholarship in the theoretical context of the last two centuries, and, second, to demystify the verse for nonspecialists, explaining why the alliterative meter, as attested in both Old and Middle English, has been so resistant to theorization.
Important work on Middle English in particular has been carried out by Jack (1978); Iyeiri (1992, 2001); Frisch (1997); Laing (2002); Wallage (2005, 2008, 2013); Ingham (2006, 2008), among others.

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