Middle High German


Also found in: Thesaurus, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Middle High German: Middle Low German

Middle High German

n.
High German from about 1000 to 1500.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Middle High German

n
(Languages) High German from about 1200 to about 1500. Abbreviation: MHG
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Mid′dle High′ Ger′man


n.
the High German dialects of c1100 to c1350 (in some classifications to c1500). Abbr.: MHG
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Middle High German - High German from 1100 to 1500Middle High German - High German from 1100 to 1500  
German language, High German, German - the standard German language; developed historically from West Germanic
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Sebastian Koch's work entitled The Heroic Struggle Against the Terrible Dragons: The Narrative Function of the Dragon Fight In Comparative Perspectives is an examination of dragons, their slayers, and the early medieval cultures (Middle High German, 1050-1350) that bore their narratives.
xv), the heroine of Hartmann's other romance, Erec (the Middle High German of the text he cites has only diu schoenste maget).
Schultz helpfully provides both the Middle High German and an English translation for all his quotations, but one still wishes for notes at the bottom of the page.
It emerged from 12th century Middle High German and was spoken by German, Dutch and Scottish settlers in the town.
Das Nibelungenlied had already survived in oral tradition for six or seven centuries before it was reworked into our Middle High German epic for performance at a south German or Austrian court around the year 1200.
Marion Aptroot's article "The Emergence of Yiddish Literature" uses the scholarly debate over a collection of ancient manuscripts in Hebrew script in order to point out the linguistic and ideological stakes in determining the border between Middle High German and Yiddish.
``Weapon,''for instance,can be traced back to the Old Norse ``vepn'' and Middle High German ``wafen''.
One of the interesting things about the mangere-derived monger is that, surprisingly, it has no etymological kinship with the two separate meanings of 'mangle.' A mangle, a machine with rollers for pressing the water out of laundry, comes from the Dutch word mangel via High German and Middle High German and originally from Latin manganum from the Greek manganon 'a pulley block.' Mangle, on the other hand, meaning 'to hack, crunch, or spoil,' comes from an Old French verb maynier 'to maim.'
While some of the Latin passages and all the Old Provencal ones are translated into German, the texts in Old French, Middle High German, and early modern German are not translated, excluding the generalist audience that would otherwise be well served by the synthetic character of the book.
Indeed, the fish's Middle High German name Bars also means something like "the spiny one" because of its prickly fins and gills.
The section of Middle High German (chapters 88-98) is now expanded by an informative account by Wegera (pp.