Middle Iranian


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Middle Iranian

adj.
Of or relating to any of the Iranian languages, such as Pahlavi or Khotanese, spoken from about the first to the tenth century ad in areas of western and central Asia.
References in periodicals archive ?
As alluded to above, the native coinage features Hellenistic, Shaiva, Vaishnava, Middle Iranian, Zoroastrian and Islamic devices and iconography.
Among specific topics are how conservative and how innovative Arabic is, the Nabataeo-Arabic script and whether the language of the inscriptions written it are Aramaic or Arabic, terminative-adverbial and locative-adverbial endings in Semitic languages: a reassessment and its implications for Arabic, Middle Iranian borrowings in Qur'anic and pre-Islamic Arabic, and digging up archaic features: "neo-Arabic" and comparative Semitic in the quest for Proto Arabic.
Skjaervo is the leading figure in the study of Old and Middle Iranian philology and Iranian religions, and there is little doubt to this fact.
Sometimes, details that became garbled in the transmission may also be elucidated with the help of Middle Iranian writings, such as Sogdian (northern) texts and Zoroastrian Pahlavi (southern) texts.
The 33 contributions thus are geared towards Emmerick's predominant scholarly interests: primarily Middle Iranian languages and texts, as well as some Old and New Iranian languages and texts.
The present volume addresses itself to the explication of a series of issues surrounding the movement of Manichaean texts and institutions from their Middle Iranian and Uighur (Old Turkish) cultural matrix to the new religious environment in China.
In a revision of her 2010 doctoral dissertation at G|ttingen University, Gholami summarizes the different characteristics of Bactrian, a Central Asian intermediary Middle Iranian language--that is, possessing characteristics of both Eastern and Western Iranian groups.
8.9 is a list of etymological studies on the Alanian and other Middle Iranian loanwords in Hungarian.
In the first third of this monograph concerned with linguistic borrowings from Iranian languages into Classical Syriac (a literary and liturgical Aramaic dialect attested from the first to thirteenth century CE) discusses features of Syriac and various historical moments of contact between the language and Old and Middle Iranian languages, Parthian, Greek, and Middle Persian.
Sogdian, also an East Middle Iranian language but written in various orthographies and styles by its Buddhist, Manichaean, and Christian speakers, is treated in the third chapter by Antje Wendtland.
63-401, followed by indexes of personal names: Old Iranian (attested and reconstructed), Middle Iranian, and New Iranian; in the Nebenuberlieferung: Greek, Elamite, Assyrian-Babylonian, Aramaic, Latin, Egyptian and Demotic, Lycian, others, and Armenian; non-Iranian: Greek names and names in Greek form, Old Indo-Aryan (Vedic), Semitic, others; theonyms, geographical names, and ethnonyms.
Its author is one of the most prominent scholars of Middle Iranian languages and literatures in general and of Sogdian in particular.