Neolithic

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Ne·o·lith·ic

 (nē′ə-lĭth′ĭk)
adj.
Of or relating to the cultural period of the Stone Age beginning around 8,000 bc in the Middle East and later elsewhere, characterized by the development of agriculture and the making of polished stone implements.
n.
The Neolithic Period. Also called New Stone Age. See Usage Note at Three Age system.

Neolithic

(ˌniːəʊˈlɪθɪk)
n
1. (Anthropology & Ethnology) the cultural period that lasted in SW Asia from about 9000 to 6000 bc and in Europe from about 4000 to 2400 bc and was characterized by primitive crop growing and stock rearing and the use of polished stone and flint tools and weapons
2. (Archaeology) the cultural period that lasted in SW Asia from about 9000 to 6000 bc and in Europe from about 4000 to 2400 bc and was characterized by primitive crop growing and stock rearing and the use of polished stone and flint tools and weapons
adj
3. (Anthropology & Ethnology) relating to this period
4. (Archaeology) relating to this period

Ne•o•lith•ic

(ˌni əˈlɪθ ɪk)

adj.
1. (sometimes l.c.) of, designating, or characteristic of the last phase of the Stone Age, commonly thought to have begun c9000–8000 B.C. in the Middle East. Compare Mesolithic, Paleolithic.
2. (usu. l.c.) belonging to or remaining from an earlier era; outdated; passé.
[1860–65]

Ne·o·lith·ic

(nē′ə-lĭth′ĭk)
The period of human culture that began around 10,000 years ago in the Middle East and later in other parts of the world. It is characterized by the beginning of farming, the domestication of animals, the development of crafts such as pottery and weaving, and the making of polished stone tools. Compare Mesolithic, Paleolithic.

Neolithic

Belonging to the latest period of the Stone Age, during which polished stone tools were made and people began to grow crops and keep animals.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Neolithic - latest part of the Stone Age beginning about 10,000 BC in the Middle East (but later elsewhere)Neolithic - latest part of the Stone Age beginning about 10,000 BC in the Middle East (but later elsewhere)
Stone Age - (archeology) the earliest known period of human culture, characterized by the use of stone implements
Adj.1.neolithic - of or relating to the most recent period of the Stone Age (following the mesolithic); "evidence of neolithic settlements"
Translations
kivikautinen

neolithic

[ˌniːəʊˈlɪθɪk] ADJneolítico

neolithic

Neolithic [ˌniːəˈlɪθɪk] adjnéolithique
to be neolithic → dater du néolithique
The monument was Stone Age or Neolithic → Le monument datait de l'âge de pierre ou du néolithique.Neolithic Age n
the Neolithic Age → le néolithique

neolithic

adjjungsteinzeitlich, neolithisch

neolithic

[ˌniːəʊˈlɪθɪk] adjneolitico/a
References in periodicals archive ?
Phase 1: Successive Early and Middle Neolithic --fifth-fourth millennia BC--occupations of the rock-shelter taking place in the context of short stays by Neolithic human groups inhabiting lower sectors of the Estrela mountain range--as will be discussed below--.
The charcoal was subsequently radiocarbon dated to the Early to Middle Neolithic (c.
Amber ornaments and preforms found at the Smelte site are very close to the Middle Neolithic forms at the Sventoji sites in Lithuania (Rimantiene 2005), the Zvejnieki cemetery (Zagorskis 2004) as well as Lake Lubana sites (Loze 2008) in Latvia.
Among the topics are inferring processes of Neolithic gene-culture co-evolution using genetic and archaeological data: the case of lactase persistence and dairying, evaluating the appearance and spread of domestic caprines in the southern Levant, early stock-keeping in Greece, the origin of stock-keeping and spread of animal exploitation strategies in the Early and Middle Neolithic of the North European Plain, and zoological data from Late Mesolithic and Neolithic sites in Switzerland about 6000-3500 BC, and earlier Neolithic subsistence in Britain and Ireland as seen through faunal remains and stable isotopes.
In addition, several early medieval pit kilns and random Middle Neolithic findings have been
To the south, in Delfland, Louwe Kooijimans' and Jongste's volume is a set-piece report on the almost total excavation of a dune at Schipluiden occupied in the second and third quarters of the fourth millennium cal BC by a Middle Neolithic Hazendonk population.