Bronze Age

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Related to Middle bronze age: Middle Stone Age, iron age, Late Bronze Age

Bronze Age

n.
A period of human culture between the Stone Age and the Iron Age, characterized by the use of weapons and implements made of bronze. See Usage Note at Three Age system.

bronze age

n
(Classical Myth & Legend) classical myth a period of human existence marked by war and violence, following the golden and silver ages and preceding the iron age

Bronze Age

n
(Archaeology) archaeol
a. a technological stage between the Stone and Iron Ages, beginning in the Middle East about 4500 bc and lasting in Britain from about 2000 to 500 bc, during which weapons and tools were made of bronze and there was intensive trading
b. (as modifier): a Bronze-Age tool.

Bronze′ Age`


n.
a period in the history of humankind, following the Stone Age and preceding the Iron Age, during which bronze weapons and implements were used: representative Old World cultures are the Minoan and Mycenaean.
[1860–65]

Bronze Age

The period between the Stone Age and the Iron Age during which people discovered how to make tools and weapons from bronze.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Bronze Age - (archeology) a period between the Stone and Iron Ages, characterized by the manufacture and use of bronze tools and weapons
archaeology, archeology - the branch of anthropology that studies prehistoric people and their cultures
prehistoric culture, prehistory - the time during the development of human culture before the appearance of the written word
2.bronze age - (classical mythology) the third age of the world, marked by war and violence
classical mythology - the system of mythology of the Greeks and Romans together; much of Roman mythology (especially the gods) was borrowed from the Greeks
period, period of time, time period - an amount of time; "a time period of 30 years"; "hastened the period of time of his recovery"; "Picasso's blue period"
Translations
pronssikausi
bronstijd

Bronze Age

n the Bronze Agel'età del bronzo
References in periodicals archive ?
A significant architectural and social change seems to have occurred near the end of the Early Bronze Age and the start of the Middle Bronze Age.
Experts dated the hoard to the Taunton period of the Middle Bronze Age, around 1400 to 1275 BC, meaning it is between 3,275 and 3,400 years old.
5) Through synchronisations with other Middle Bronze Age ceramic assemblages on the mainland, Maran has shown that all three of these phases belong to the latter part of the MH period and even to the earliest parts of the Late Helladic (LH) period.
She said: "It is a copper alloy flat axe from the early to middle Bronze Age, dated from 1850-1750BC.
The Early Bronze Age IV (2300-2000 BC) people had continued to carve vertical shaft tombs in marl and chalk layers (two soft and weak layers) besides other types as in Middle Bronze Age I including big jars (Waheeb & Palumbo 1994), such as Umm Zaytuna (Waheeb et al.
If, like other authors (Sevillano 1982), we assume that there are rivets on the hilt of the weapon, the representation associated with the idol of Pena Tu would necessarily have to date from the beginning of the Middle Bronze Age, according to the concept presented in Cardoso (2002), i.
The gold strip was probably part of a bracelet worn on the arm in the Middle Bronze Age .
The second cultural layer consists of five phases that belong to the Middle Bronze Age and which dates from the first half of the 2nd millennium B.
Experts indicate they were buried with the hoard sometime between early to middle Bronze Age, 1100BC and 1600BC.
The catalogue is organised in chronological sections: Copper Age, Middle Bronze Age, Recent Bronze Age (specific to Italy), Final Bronze Age and Early Iron Age.
Though no substantial metallurgical work has been done on the matter, the ancient literature of the Early and Middle Bronze Age city-states does support this theory, presenting Mesopotamian trade routes as the ones used to transfer the tin from the west to Eastern Mesopotamia.
Chapters 3 and 4 deal with scarabs found in early and late Middle Bronze Age deposits in Palestine.

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