middleman

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mid·dle·man

 (mĭd′l-măn′)
n.
1. A trader who buys from producers and sells to retailers or consumers.
2. An intermediary; a go-between.

middleman

(ˈmɪdəlˌmæn)
n, pl -men
1. (Commerce) an independent trader engaged in the distribution of goods from producer to consumer
2. an intermediary
3. (Theatre) theatre the interlocutor in minstrel shows

mid•dle•man

(ˈmɪd lˌmæn)

n., pl. -men.
1. a person who buys goods from the producer and resells them to the retailer or consumer.
2. a person who acts as an intermediary.
[1785–95]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.middleman - someone who buys large quantities of goods and resells to merchants rather than to the ultimate customersmiddleman - someone who buys large quantities of goods and resells to merchants rather than to the ultimate customers
distributer, distributor - someone who markets merchandise
meat packer, packer - a wholesaler in the meat-packing business
2.middleman - the performer in the middle of a minstrel line who engages the others in talk
minstrel - a performer in a minstrel show
3.middleman - a person who is in a position to give you special assistancemiddleman - a person who is in a position to give you special assistance; "he used his business contacts to get an introduction to the governor"
representative - a person who represents others

middleman

noun intermediary, broker, entrepreneur, distributor, go-between Why don't they cut out the middleman and let us do it ourselves?

middleman

noun
Someone who acts as an intermediate agent in a transaction or helps to resolve differences:
Translations
سِمْسار، وَسيط
zprostředkovatel
mellemmand
välikäsivälimiesvälittäjä
milliliîur
tussenhandelaartussenpersoon
posrednik

middleman

[ˈmɪdlmæn] N (middlemen (pl)) (Comm) → intermediario/a m/f

middleman

[ˈmɪdəlmæn] nintermédiaire m
through a middleman → par l'entremise d'un intermédiaire
to cut out the middleman → supprimer les intermédiairesmiddle management ncadres mpl moyensmiddle manager ncadre m moyenmiddle name n
(= second Christian name) → deuxième prénom m
(= key characteristic)
Geniality is my middle name → Je suis la bienveillance incarnée.middle-of-the-road [ˌmɪdələvðəˈrəʊd] adj
[opinions, policies] → modéré(e)
[music] → grand public invmiddle school
ncollège m
modif [head teacher] → du collège; [library, cafeteria] → du collège; [mathematics] → des collèges
middle school student → collégien(ne) m/fmiddle-sized [ˈmɪdəlsaɪzd] adj [town, company] → de taille moyenne

middleman

[ˈmɪdlˌmæn] n (-men (pl)) (gen) → intermediario (Comm) → (agente m) rivenditore m

middle

(ˈmidl) noun
1. the central point or part. the middle of a circle.
2. the central area of the body; the waist. You're getting rather fat round your middle.
adjective
equally distant from both ends. the middle seat in a row.
ˈmiddling adjective
average. He's neither tall nor short, but of middling height.
middle age
the years between youth and old age. She is well into middle age.
ˌmiddle-ˈaged adjective
Middle Ages (with the)
the time between the end of the Roman Empire and the Renaissance.
Middle East (with the)
Egypt and the countries of Asia west of Pakistan.
ˈmiddleman (-mӕn) noun
a dealer who buys goods from the person who makes or grows them, and sells them to shopkeepers or to the public; a wholesaler. You can save money by buying direct from the factory and cutting out the middleman.
be in the middle of (doing) something
to be busily occupied doing something. Please excuse my appearance. I was in the middle of washing my hair.
References in classic literature ?
The merchant fishermen at the falls acted as middlemen or factors, and passed the objects of traffic, as it were, cross-handed; trading away part of the wares received from the mountain tribes to those of the rivers and plains, and vice versa: their packages of pounded salmon entered largely into the system of barter, and being carried off in opposite directions, found their way to the savage hunting camps far in the interior, and to the casual white traders who touched upon the coast.
We also see the occasional instance of reintermediation in which middlemen are put back into the supply chain to better serve small accounts or customers with special needs.
The camera in Aernout Mik's video Middlemen, 2001, spins with cycloramic effect, making us central witnesses to catastrophic human disarray on par with Dante's seventh ring: Stock market traders--some human, some automatons--appear aghast, bewildered, psychologically adrift, and physically spasmodic staggering along the dark fringes of fiscal ruin.
But since it's hard to prosecute gambling operations based in other countries (and since placing a bet is not necessarily illegal, depending upon the state where the gambler lives), the government is threatening middlemen instead.
They sell to retailers - they don't sell to middlemen to sell to retailers.
"The practice of organ purchase has acquired the dubious dimension of a dubious trade involving touts, middlemen who even create false records to make a donor appear like a compassionate donor," Anand said.
Middlemen. Latin America's native groups need only look to Ecuador to see the potential.
Due to wildly fluctuating world commodity prices and ruthless middlemen, many West African growers live in poverty, and many have never even tasted the chocolate their cocoa is used to make.
Commercial agents and middlemen, while often reviled by farmers in later years, were, in mid-century, able to exert pressure over local retailers and make them more responsive to the demands and desires of rural consumers.
Early on, Omidyar realized that "the Internet was driving down the value of middlemen because it was making it easier--and therefore more economically efficient--for individuals to carry out their own transactions." By providing a setting where buyer and seller could come together in free-market bliss, Omidyar hoped to discover whether or not a perfect market could be established.
The state of New York has brought charges against 30 individuals, including owners who allegedly falsely reported that their cars had been stolen and middlemen who sold the vehicles.