mid-ocean ridge

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Related to Midocean ridge: Oceanic trench

mid-o·cean ridge

 (mĭd′ō′shən)
n.
1. Any of various underwater mountain ranges forming a chain that extends almost continuously for about 66,000 kilometers (41,000 miles) through the North and South Atlantic Oceans, the Indian Ocean, and the South Pacific Ocean at the boundaries between divergent tectonic plates. Magma escapes from rifts along the tops of these ranges, adding new material to the earth's crust.
2. The system of these mountain ranges considered as a single geologic feature.

mid-o·cean ridge

(mĭd′ō′shən)
A long mountain range on the ocean floor, extending almost continuously through the North and South Atlantic Oceans, the Indian Ocean, and the South Pacific Ocean. A deep rift valley is located at its center, from which magma flows and forms new oceanic crust. As the magma cools and hardens it becomes part of the mountain range. See more at tectonic boundary.
References in periodicals archive ?
This finding differs from the established idea that a slow spreading rate at a midocean ridge cools geologic materials and does not produce much melt.
Hydrothermal environments in Earth's oceans, such as the 50,000-kilometer-long string of underwater volcanoes that forms the midocean ridge system, can be virtual smorgasbords of life.
Northern vents An undersea survey along a midocean ridge beneath the Arctic ice pack unveiled an unexpected abundance of hydrothermal activity (163: 37).
A recent survey along a midocean ridge beneath the Arctic icepack unveiled an unexpected abundance of hydrothermal activity.
Axial has captured the attention of marine scientists over the last few years because it appears to be active and it sits directly atop a section of the midocean ridge system.
Recent studies have shown that volcanic eruptions from this midocean ridge release huge numbers of bacteria that apparently thrive under the ocean floor, says S.
This midocean ridge -- part of a worldwide system -- represents the border where two of Earth's surface plates spread apart.
"If a considerable amount of such upwelling occurs rapidly along sloped boundaries, continental margins, and midocean ridges, then the time scale of recycling of abyssal waters can be shorter." [Source: MIT]
Hydrothermal vents form where Earth's crustal plates gradually are spreading apart Hot magma is seeping up from below to create mountain ranges termed midocean ridges. As cracks develop where this spreading occurs, the seawater sinks a mile or two down into the hot rock below.
Earth's ocean floors, with their midocean ridges and magnetic stripes, were mapped by ships, revealing a global pattern of tectonic motions that build up mountains and constantly re-make Earth's surface.
The mountains might have formed when tectonic forces pulled apart Titan's crust, permitting material to rise from below, as the midocean ridges arose on Earth.
Along these, magma, fluid rock, pours out over time, forming the most massive mountain chains on Earth: the midocean ridges. These ridges are the sites of ocean-floor creation.