mien

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Related to Miens: means, atavism, mines

mien

a person’s look or bearing: a woman of regal mien
Not to be confused with:
mean – intend: What do you mean?; signify, indicate, imply; malicious: a mean bully

Mien

 (myĕn)
n.
A Hmong-Mien language spoken by many subgroups of the Yao of China.

mien

 (mēn)
n.
1. Bearing or manner, especially as it reveals an inner state of mind: a colonel with an imperious mien.
2. An appearance or aspect. "Eyes fixed in a piercing squint ... his was a mien that made an easy target for political cartoonists" (Nick Kotz).

[Alteration (influenced by French mine, appearance) of Middle English demeine, demeanor, from Old French, from demener, to behave; see demean1.]

mien

(miːn)
n
literary a person's manner, bearing, or appearance, expressing personality or mood: a noble mien.
[C16: probably variant of obsolete demean appearance; related to French mine aspect]

mien

(min)

n.
air, bearing, or demeanor, as showing character, feeling, etc.: a person of noble mien.
[1505–15; probably aph. variant of demean2; spelled with -ie- to distinguish it from mean2]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mien - dignified manner or conductmien - dignified manner or conduct    
personal manner, manner - a way of acting or behaving
gravitas, lordliness, dignity - formality in bearing and appearance; "he behaved with great dignity"

mien

noun demeanour, look, air, bearing, appearance, aspect, presence, manner, carriage, aura, countenance, deportment his mild manner and aristocratic mien

mien

noun
1. Behavior through which one reveals one's personality:
Archaic: port.
2. The way something or someone looks:
Translations

mien

[miːn] N (liter) → aire m, porte m, semblante m

mien

n (liter)Miene f

mien

[miːn] n (liter) → contegno
References in classic literature ?
ONE pleasant day in the latter part of eternity, as the Shades of all the great writers were reposing upon beds of asphodel and moly in the Elysian fields, each happy in hearing from the lips of the others nothing but copious quotation from his own works (for so Jove had kindly bedeviled their ears), there came in among them with triumphant mien a Shade whom none knew.
The middle one of the three windows was half-way open; and sitting close beside it, taking the air with an infinite sadness of mien, like some disconsolate prisoner, Utterson saw Dr.
There were the sober garb, the general severity of mien, the gloomy but undismayed expression, the scriptural forms of speech, and the confidence in Heaven's blessing on a righteous cause, which would have marked a band of the original Puritans, when threatened by some peril of the wilderness.
And Aphrodite, the daughter of Zeus stood before him, being like a pure maiden in height and mien, that he should not be frightened when he took heed of her with his eyes.
Open here I flung the shutter, when, with many a flirt and flutter, In there stepped a stately raven of the saintly days of yore; Not the least obeisance made he; not an instant stopped or stayed he; But, with mien of lord or lady, perched above my chamber door -- Perched upon a bust of Pallas just above my chamber door -- Perched, and sat, and nothing more.
Not the least obeisance made he; not a minute stopped or stayed he, But, with mien of lord or lady, perched above my chamber door-- Perched upon a bust of Pallas just above my chamber door-- Perched, and sat, and nothing more.
It would have made a fine picture, worthy of Rembrandt, the gloomy winding stairs illuminated by the reddish glare of the cresset of Gryphus, with his scowling jailer's countenance at the top, the melancholy figure of Cornelius bending over the banister to look down upon the sweet face of Rosa, standing, as it were, in the bright frame of the door of her chamber, with embarrassed mien at being thus seen by a stranger.
It might be, on this one day, that there was an expression unseen before, nor, indeed, vivid enough to be detected now; unless some preternaturally gifted observer should have first read the heart, and have afterwards sought a corresponding development in the countenance and mien. Such a spiritual sneer might have conceived, that, after sustaining the gaze of the multitude through several miserable years as a necessity, a penance, and something which it was a stern religion to endure, she now, for one last time more, encountered it freely and voluntarily, in order to convert what had so long been agony into a kind of triumph.