millipede

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mil·li·pede

also mil·le·pede  (mĭl′ə-pēd′)
n.
Any of various arthropods of the class Diplopoda, having a cylindrical segmented body with two pairs of legs attached to each segment except for the first four thoracic segments, and feeding chiefly on decaying organic matter. Also called diplopod.

[Latin mīlipeda, a kind of insect : mīlle, thousand; see gheslo- in Indo-European roots + pēs, ped-, foot; see ped- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

millipede

(ˈmɪlɪˌpiːd) or

millepede

;

milleped

n
(Animals) any terrestrial herbivorous arthropod of the class Diplopoda, having a cylindrical body made up of many segments, each of which bears two pairs of walking legs. See also myriapod
[C17: from Latin, from mille thousand + pēs foot]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mil•li•pede

or mil•le•pede

(ˈmɪl əˌpid)

n.
any terrestrial arthropod of the class Diplopoda, having a cylindrical body composed of 20 to more than 100 segments, each with two pairs of legs.
[1595–1605; < Latin mīlipeda (Pliny) =mīli- milli- + -peda, derivative of pēs, s. ped- foot]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

mil·li·pede

(mĭl′ə-pēd′)
Any of various worm-like arthropods having a body composed of many narrow segments, most of which have two pairs of legs. Millipedes feed on plants and, unlike centipedes, do not have venomous pincers. Compare centipede.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.millipede - any of numerous herbivorous nonpoisonous arthropods having a cylindrical body of 20 to 100 or more segments most with two pairs of legsmillipede - any of numerous herbivorous nonpoisonous arthropods having a cylindrical body of 20 to 100 or more segments most with two pairs of legs
arthropod - invertebrate having jointed limbs and a segmented body with an exoskeleton made of chitin
class Diplopoda, class Myriapoda, Diplopoda, Myriapoda - arthropods having the body composed of numerous double somites each with two pairs of legs: millipedes
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
كثير الأرجُل: إم الأربَع والأربعين
mnohonožka
tusindben
tuhatjalkainen
òúsundfætla
daudzkājis

millipede

[ˈmɪlɪpiːd] Nmilpiés m inv
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

millipede

[ˈmɪlɪpiːd] nmille-pattes m inv
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

millipede

nTausendfüß(l)er m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

millipede

[ˈmɪlɪˌpiːd] nmillepiedi m inv
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

millipede

(ˈmilipiːd) noun
a small many-legged creature with a long round body.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
And there are only two possible choices: Silverspoon Cameron or the Milipede.
Compo and Clegg at Number 10, Milipede, Farage - four blokes, and not a pair of testicles between them.
Poor show, Milipede. But it became fixed in my mind, of course, so when I sat next to David Cameron on a train to Plymouth on Wednesday I could not help but stare at his barnet.