Milky Way


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Milky Way

n.
1. The galaxy containing the sun, solar system, and all of the individually visible stars in the night sky, along with various nebulae, star clusters, and dust clouds, thought to have a super-massive black hole at its center of mass.
2. The broad meandering band of faint light that consists of stars from this galaxy and is often visible in the night sky.

[Middle English, translation of Latin via lactea : via, way + lactea, feminine of lacteus, milky.]

Milky Way

n
1. (Celestial Objects) the diffuse band of light stretching across the night sky that consists of millions of faint stars, nebulae, etc, within our Galaxy
2. (Celestial Objects) another name for the Galaxy
[C14: translation of Latin via lactea]

Milk′y Way′


n.
the spiral galaxy containing our solar system, seen as a luminous band stretching across the night sky and composed of approximately a trillion stars.
[1350–1400; Middle English, translation of Latin via lactea; compare galaxy]

Milk·y Way

(mĭl′kē)
The galaxy containing the solar system. It is visible as a broad band of faint light in the night sky.

Milky Way

The spiral galaxy home of our solar system. Its 150 billion stars extend for 500,000 light years and have existed for about 12 billion years.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Milky Way - the galaxy containing the solar systemMilky Way - the galaxy containing the solar system; consists of millions of stars that can be seen as a diffuse band of light stretching across the night sky
extragalactic nebula, galaxy - (astronomy) a collection of star systems; any of the billions of systems each having many stars and nebulae and dust; "`extragalactic nebula' is a former name for `galaxy'"
heliosphere - the region inside the heliopause containing the sun and solar system
Crux, Crux Australis, Southern Cross - a small conspicuous constellation in the southern hemisphere in the Milky Way near Centaurus
Translations
Mléčná dráha
Linnunrata
vetrarbraut
Via Lactea
Vintergatan

Milky Way

nMilchstraße f

Milky Way

n the Milky Wayla Via Lattea
References in classic literature ?
Levin listened to the monotonous drip from the lime trees in the garden, and looked at the triangle of stars he knew so well, and the Milky Way with its branches that ran through its midst.
Is it that by its indefiniteness it shadows forth the heartless voids and immensities of the universe, and thus stabs us from behind with the thought of annihilation, when beholding the white depths of the milky way? Or is it, that as in essence whiteness is not so much a color as the visible absence of color, and at the same time the concrete of all colors; is it for these reasons that there is such a dumb blankness, full of meaning, in a wide landscape of snows --a colorless, all-color of atheism from which we shrink?
Among these 5,000 nebulae there is one which has received the name of the Milky Way, and which contains eighteen millions of stars, each of which has become the center of a solar world.
He recovered the axe in the midst of the Milky Way of checks, starched shirts, and manuscripts, and prepared, when he came down, to kill Joe.
And some certain significance lurks in all things, else all things are little worth, and the round world itself but an empty cipher, except to sell by the cartload, as they do hills about Boston, to fill up some morass in the Milky Way. Now this doubloon was of purest, virgin gold, raked somewhere out of the heart of gorgeous hills, whence, east and west, over golden sands, the head-waters of many a Pactolus flows.
One thinks Heidelberg by day--with its surroundings-- is the last possibility of the beautiful; but when he sees Heidelberg by night, a fallen Milky Way, with that glittering railway constellation pinned to the border, he requires time to consider upon the verdict.
Thus a spray of clematis would completely obscure Cassiopeia, or blot out with its black pattern myriads of miles of the Milky Way. At the end of the pergola, however, there was a stone seat, from which the sky could be seen completely swept clear of any earthly interruption, save to the right, indeed, where a line of elm-trees was beautifully sprinkled with stars, and a low stable building had a full drop of quivering silver just issuing from the mouth of the chimney.
But the Milky Way, it seemed to me, was still the same tattered streamer of star-dust as of yore.
After undergoing renovation, Milky Way reopened its doors last May.
According to Kirkpatrick, Milky Way will eventually end up in the same way after its black hole becomes big enough to strip away the gas and dust.
The Milky Way weighs in at about 1.5 trillion solar masses (one solar mass is the mass of our Sun), according to the latest measurements.
But astronomers have long argued as to whether the Milky Way bulked up on a diet of baby star clusters, or by merging with a single Big One.