torr

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torr

 (tôr)
n. pl. torr
A unit of pressure that is equal to approximately 1.316 × 10-3 atmosphere or 133.3 pascals.

[After Evangelista Torricelli.]

torr

(tɔː)
n, pl torr
(Units) a unit of pressure equal to one millimetre of mercury (133.322 newtons per square metre)
[C20: named after E. Torricelli]

torr

(tɔr)

n.
a unit of pressure, being the pressure necessary to support a column of mercury one millimeter high at 0°C and standard gravity, equal to 1333.2 microbars.
[1945–50; after E. Torricelli]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.torr - a unit of pressure equal to 0.001316 atmospheretorr - a unit of pressure equal to 0.001316 atmosphere; named after Torricelli
pressure unit - a unit measuring force per unit area
References in periodicals archive ?
Atmospheric pressure will be 761 millimeters of mercury; relative humidity will be 60-70% at night, 30-40% at daytime.
High blood pressure was considered any measurement more than 140/90 millimeters of mercury, whereas low blood pressure was defined as less than 90/60 millimeters of mercury.
After completing the marathon, the participants' aortic stiffness, a normal part of aging, was reduced, particularly in older participants and those with longer marathon finish times, and blood pressure dropped by 4 millimeters of mercury. The health benefits were comparable to the effect of medication, the study authors noted, and could translate to a 10 percent lower risk of stroke.
The results showed that systolic BP (the top number in a reading) averaged 5.5 millimeters of mercury (mmHg) higher at the wrist than at the upper arm.
A systolic pressure of below 170 mm Hg (millimeters of mercury) suggests that a cat does not have hypertension.
Borderline-high blood pressure is between 120/80 and 140/90 millimeters of mercury. According to the American College of Cardiology, all adults should reduce their sodium intake to less than 2,000 mg per day, start the DASH diet, lose weight to maintain a normal body mass index, exercise regularly, limit alcohol, and quit smoking.
Entry criteria include unmedicated baseline IOP ranges of 15 mmHg, or millimeters of mercury, to less than 35 mmHg for patients with open-angle glaucoma, and 22 mmHg to less than 35 mmHg for patients with ocular hypertension.
In addition, their blood pressure dropped by an average of seven millimeters of mercury over the length of the study.
The results also showed that:Only 47 percent of those taking drugs to reduce high blood pressure were achieving a target of under 140/90 millimeters of mercury, or under 140/85 for those who reported having diabetes.
Researchers studied 129 overweight adults with blood pressures between 130 and 160 millimeters of mercury (mmHg) systolic and 80 and 99 mmHg diastolic, but who were not taking antihypertension medication.
The levels of compression are expressed in millimeters of mercury (mmHg), and different levels of compression socks are used in a treatment of different medical conditions.
On average, participants consumed about 350 fewer calories, lost about 3 percent of their body weight and saw their systolic blood pressure decreased by about 7 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg), the standard measure of blood pressure. 

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