Mills bomb


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Mills bomb

(mɪlz)
n
(Firearms, Gunnery, Ordnance & Artillery) a type of high-explosive hand grenade
[C20: named after Sir William Mills (1856–1932), English inventor]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The grenade, known as a Mills Bomb, was used by the British Army from 1915 until the 1980s, and had a "danger zone" of around 100 yards.
The grenade, known as a Mills Bomb, used by the British Army from 1915 until the 1980s, had a "danger zone" of around 100 yards and was designed to shower the enemy with shrapnel.
When examined, Talusan said the grenades were all replicas of Stielhan dragnet, Mills bomb and an M67 grenade that was made of resin 'but looks real enough.'
Quick!' "The man handed Morgan a Mills bomb. Morgan grabbed it and without any hesitation or thought he hurled it at 617.
"For dinner we sometimes threw a Mills bomb in the sea, which would stun sacks of fish.
I thought April Fool's Day had come early or this was an exercise for the police; for four hours they moved residents out of their homes into the street supposedly for safety when in fact they moved them into danger - there is no chance that a Mills bomb will destroy a building.
He can also tell of a close encounter with a Mills bomb, a British First World War hand grenade, which was seen leaning against the leg of a camera tripod during a day's filming, and which local experts came to deactivate.
I had a Mills Bomb in each pocket and 240 rounds of ammunition.
Incorporating a central spring-loaded firing pin and lever, the so-called "Mills bomb" featured a ridged cast iron exterior and a seven-second fuse--later reduced to four seconds during World War II--to allow the throwing soldier to take cover before an explosion.
The fusing assembly on the Stokes bomb resembled that of the famous British hand grenade, the Mills Bomb. A 4-inch (102mm) version of the Stokes mortar was adopted by the United States upon its entry into the war in 1917.
The two most successful grenades of the war would undoubtedly be the German M1917 "stick" grenade and the British Mills Bomb. Both went on in slightly altered form to see widespread use during WWII, which as we all know, was simply round two of WWI.
MILLS BOMB: England's James Anderson celebrates as he bowls Kyle Mills - the Kiwi scored an enterprising 57; HAIR RAID: England's Ryan Sidebottom celebrates taking Aaron Redmond's wicket