Mills bomb


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Mills bomb

(mɪlz)
n
(Firearms, Gunnery, Ordnance & Artillery) a type of high-explosive hand grenade
[C20: named after Sir William Mills (1856–1932), English inventor]
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References in periodicals archive ?
I thought April Fool's Day had come early or this was an exercise for the police; for four hours they moved residents out of their homes into the street supposedly for safety when in fact they moved them into danger - there is no chance that a Mills bomb will destroy a building.
It was a Mills bomb, often given to the Home Guard.
He can also tell of a close encounter with a Mills bomb, a British First World War hand grenade, which was seen leaning against the leg of a camera tripod during a day's filming, and which local experts came to deactivate.
The grenade, thought to be a Mills bomb, was taken from the garden in Bournemouth, Dorset, by the Royal Navy Ordnance Disposal Team and destroyed.
I had a Mills Bomb in each pocket and 240 rounds of ammunition.
The fusing assembly on the Stokes bomb resembled that of the famous British hand grenade, the Mills Bomb.
Interestingly enough, one is an offensive grenade--the M1917, while the Mills Bomb was a defensive grenade.
It was known as the Mills Bomb, and was the Army's standard hand grenade during the 1914-18 conflict, when around 75m of them were produced.
The conscientious recruit's frustration at the tepidness and impracticality of the training regime seemed to reach a boiling point when combat skills vital to survival in the trenches, such as handling of Mills bombs, were taught in rigid textbook like fashion without actually going through the motions of handling or throwing an actual Mills bomb.
Her great uncle, Williams Mills from Sunderland, developed the Mills Bomb hand grenade at his factory in Birmingham.
THE HAND GRENADE In 1915, William Mills developed a model, known as the Mills bomb, with a 'pin-and-pineapple' design.