Milton


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Mil·ton

 (mĭl′tən), John 1608-1674.
English poet and scholar who is best known for the epic poem Paradise Lost (1667), an account of humanity's fall from grace.

Mil·ton′ic (-tŏn′ĭk) adj.

Milton

(ˈmɪltən)
n
(Biography) John. 1608–74, English poet. His early works, notably L'Allegro and Il Penseroso (1632), the masque Comus (1634), and the elegy Lycidas (1637), show the influence of his Christian humanist education and his love of Italian Renaissance poetry. A staunch Parliamentarian and opponent of episcopacy, he published many pamphlets during the Civil War period, including Areopagitica (1644), which advocated freedom of the press. His greatest works were the epic poems Paradise Lost (1667; 1674), and Paradise Regained (1671) and the verse drama Samson Agonistes (1671)

Mil•ton

(ˈmɪl tn)

n.
John, 1608–74, English poet.
Mil•ton′ic (-ˈtɒn ɪk) Mil•to′ni•an (-ˈtoʊ ni ən) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Milton - English poetMilton - English poet; remembered primarily as the author of an epic poem describing humanity's fall from grace (1608-1674)
References in classic literature ?
"THERE is but one Milton,"* there is, too, but one Shakespeare, yet John Milton, far more than William Shakespeare, stands a lonely figure in our literature.
No educated person ought to be ignorant of Milton. Let us be educated persons.
It is by living at home with you that she hath learnt romantic notions of love and nonsense." "You don't imagine, I hope," cries the squire, "that I have taught her any such things." "Your ignorance, brother," returned she, "as the great Milton says, almost subdues my patience."[*] "D--n Milton!" answered the squire: "if he had the impudence to say so to my face, I'd lend him a douse, thof he was never so great a man.
MY DEAR SIR, I came from my house at Milton, the 26 in the morning.
Nevertheless this period includes in prose one writer greater than any prose writer of the previous century, namely Francis Bacon, and, further, the book which unquestionably occupies the highest place in English literature, that is the King James version of the Bible; and in poetry it includes one of the very greatest figures, John Milton, together with a varied and highly interesting assemblage of lesser lyrists.
There are, of course, many objections to what I say: Milton is a great example of the contrary; but his opinion with respect to the 'Paradise Regained' is by no means fairly ascertained.
Only the rare and exceptional genius of Vergil and Milton could use the Homeric medium without loss of individuality: and this quality none of the later epic poets seem to have possessed.
"Could I not be preparing myself now to be more useful?" said Dorothea to him, one morning, early in the time of courtship; "could I not learn to read Latin and Greek aloud to you, as Milton's daughters did to their father, without understanding what they read?"
Long after I had thought never to read it--in fact when I was 'nel mezzo del cammin di nostra vita'--I read Milton's "Paradise Lost," and found in it a majestic beauty that justified to me the fame it wears, and eclipsed the worth of those lesser poems which I had ignorantly accounted his worthiest.
I used to be quite up in that scene of Milton's when I was theological.
He grew remarkably drunk, and then he began to recite poetry, his own and Milton's, his own and Shelley's, his own and Kit Marlowe's.
"Homer was blind, and so was Milton, and they did something to be remembered by, in spite of it," he said, as if to himself, in a solemn tone, for even the blue goggles did not bring a smile.