minaret

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min·a·ret

 (mĭn′ə-rĕt′)
n.
A tall slender tower attached to a mosque, having one or more projecting balconies from which a muezzin or a recording of a muezzin summons the people to prayer.

[Ultimately (partly via French) from Ottoman Turkish mināre, from earlier menāre, from Arabic manāra, lamp, beacon tower of a fortress; see nwr in Semitic roots.]

minaret

(ˌmɪnəˈrɛt; ˈmɪnəˌrɛt)
n
1. (Architecture) a slender tower of a mosque having one or more balconies from which the muezzin calls the faithful to prayer
2. (Architecture) any structure resembling this
[C17: from French, from Turkish, from Arabic manārat lamp, from nār fire]
ˌminaˈreted adj

min•a•ret

(ˌmɪn əˈrɛt, ˈmɪn əˌrɛt)

n.
a lofty, often slender tower attached to a mosque, having one or more balconies from which the muezzin calls the people to prayer.
[1675–85; < French minaret, Sp minarete, or Italian minaretto « Arabic manārah lighthouse]
min`a•ret′ed, adj.

minaret

A tower usually attached to a mosque from which the Muslim faithful are called to prayer.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.minaret - slender tower with balconiesminaret - slender tower with balconies  
mosque - (Islam) a Muslim place of worship that usually has a minaret
tower - a structure taller than its diameter; can stand alone or be attached to a larger building
Translations
مِئْذَنَه
minaret
minaret
minareto
minarett
minareetti
minaret
bænaturn
minaretas
minarets
minaret

minaret

[mɪnəˈret] Nalminar m, minarete m

minaret

[ˌmɪnəˈrɛt] nminaret m

minaret

nMinarett nt

minaret

[ˌmɪnəˈrɛt] nminareto

minaret

(minəˈret) noun
a tower on a mosque from which the call to prayer is sounded.
References in classic literature ?
The minarets of the town loomed above the houses in the pale rays of the sun.
Never did a mountain seem so close; its big sides seemed at one's very elbow, and its majestic dome, and the lofty cluster of slender minarets that were its neighbors, seemed to be almost over one's head.
I saw the rounded domes of its mosques, the elegant points of its minarets, its fresh and verdant terraces.
The spoor lay directly along the trail for another half-mile when the way suddenly debouched from the forest into open land and there broke upon the astonished view of the ape-man the domes and minarets of a walled city.
And here were marble houses of curious forms, most of them resembling overturned kettles but with delicate slender spires and minarets running far up into the sky.
Burch had not said so, but perhaps there were mosques and temples and minarets and date-palms.
The moonlight revealed glimpses of one district half in ruins; and some pinnacles of mosques and minarets shot up here and there, glistening in the silvery rays.
She showed him an Eastern town with flat roofs and cupolas and minarets. In the foreground was a group of palm-trees, and under them were resting two Arabs and some camels.
This enclosure, all green and gold and glittering with precious gems, was indeed a wonderful sight to greet our travelers, who first observed it from the top of a little hill; but beyond the wall was the vast city it surrounded, and hundreds of jeweled spires, domes and minarets, flaunting flags and banners, reared their crests far above the towers of the gateways.
At the edge of the desolate valley, overlooking the golden domes and minarets of Opar, Tarzan halted.
And on the far side of the valley lay what appeared to be a mighty city, its great walls, its lofty spires, its turrets, minarets, and domes showing red and yellow in the sunlight.
Its dense array of houses swells upward from the water's edge, and spreads over the domes of many hills; and the gardens that peep out here and there, the great globes of the mosques, and the countless minarets that meet the eye every where, invest the metropolis with the quaint Oriental aspect one dreams of when he reads books of eastern travel.