minefield

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mine·field

 (mīn′fēld′)
n.
1. An area in which explosive mines have been placed.
2. A situation that has many potential hazards or dangers.

minefield

(ˈmaɪnˌfiːld)
n
1. (Firearms, Gunnery, Ordnance & Artillery) an area of ground or water containing explosive mines
2. a subject, situation, etc, beset with hidden problems

mine•field

(ˈmaɪnˌfild)

n.
1. an area of land or water where explosive mines have been laid.
2. a situation fraught with potential problems or dangers: a legislative minefield facing the city council.
[1885–90]

minefield

1. In land warfare, an area of ground containing mines emplaced with or without a pattern.
2. In naval warfare, an area of water containing mines laid with or without a pattern. See also land mine warfare; mine; mine warfare.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.minefield - a region in which explosives mines have been placedminefield - a region in which explosives mines have been placed
armed forces, armed services, military, military machine, war machine - the military forces of a nation; "their military is the largest in the region"; "the military machine is the same one we faced in 1991 but now it is weaker"

minefield

noun danger zone The subject is a political minefield.
Translations
حَقْل ألْغام
minové pole
minefelt
miinakenttä
aknamezõ
sprengjubelti
mínové pole
minsko polje
mayın tarlası

minefield

[ˈmaɪnfiːld] N
1. (lit) → campo m de minas
2. (fig) → avispero m, campo m minado

minefield

[ˈmaɪnfiːld] n
(lit)champ m de mines
(fig) (= danger area) a political minefield → un terrain miné, politiquement

minefield

[ˈmaɪnˌfiːld] n (also) (fig) → campo minato

mine2

(main) noun
1. a place (usually underground) from which metals, coal, salt etc are dug. a coalmine; My father worked in the mines.
2. a type of bomb used underwater or placed just beneath the surface of the ground. The ship has been blown up by a mine.
verb
1. to dig (for metals etc) in a mine. Coal is mined near here.
2. to place explosive mines in. They've mined the mouth of the river.
3. to blow up with mines. His ship was mined.
ˈminer noun
a person who works in a mine, in Britain usually a coalminer.
ˈmining noun
ˈminefield noun
an area of ground or water which is full of explosive mines.
References in periodicals archive ?
In conjunction with the Humpty Dumpty Institute (HDI), a New York-based nonprofit organization working to clear minefields around the world, the New York Wine and Grape Foundation (NYWGF) has organized a series of special events to raise funds to clear minefields in the Fizuli district of Azerbaijan.
Similarly, honeynet minefields represent the scenario where each mine is an entire network, as opposed to just a single honeypot.
Before any land Volcano System can be used to emplace a minefield, fratricide prevention fences must be erected, just like those used for conventional hand-emplaced minefields.
The holes also become pits with teeth in minefields or landscapes that bite, as well as the centers of mutant flowers (another motif of the artist's sculptures), some armored with bladelike petals.
Under the new partnership between Adopt-a-Minefield and MAG, the public is being invited to "adopt" minefields in Vietnam.
Individual mines in minefields are located by metal detectors or dogs.
The Apobs will provide the armed forces with an enhanced man-portable capability to breach anti-personnel minefields and wire obstacles.
LANDMINES that hop around to foil crews that clear minefields are under development in the US.
Mine explosions kill and injure dozens of people every month, and minefields render stretches of land along the former front line unusable.
The task is now in the "verification phase," with personnel using sniffer dogs and specially-fitted bulldozers to sweep through the minefields to ensure all devices have been detected and removed.
But she couldn't stop thinking about those who were wounded or killed when they walked innocently into a minefield. She wrote to her British friend, `If you can find any organization that clears minefields and can tell me how many mines can be cleared for $1,000, I will provide some money for them.' She ended up raising $100,000 for the Halo Trust.
The motor propels the Mine Clearing Line Charge System (MCLCS), which was used extensively by Desert Storm's front-linetroops for clearing minefields.