Mini-Me


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Mini-Me

(ˈmɪnɪˌmiː)
n
1. a person who resembles a smaller or younger version of another person
2. a person who adopts the opinions or mannerisms of a more powerful or senior person in order to win favour, achieve promotion, etc
[C20: after a character in the 1999 film Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
I don't know which planet Johnson's astronauts are on when all the Trump mini-me's pretend Britain's great in their hands, presenting a sticking plaster for the NHS as a miracle cure for the gaping wound cleaved into our most precious public service.
It has a nursery, a changing room for children and dedicated lockers to keep your mini-me's belongings safe as he or she runs around with her new-found playmates.
So, Princess Eugenie mini-me's will have subsidiary titles.
Her silver-framed photograph dominates the mantelpiece - long, blonde hair, sleek against a white background, her daughters lean in close, two thoroughbred mini-me's.
While many stick with family tradition these days, mini-me's moniker can be a statement, perhaps a tribute to a celebrity or a unique name to make your child stand out from the crowd.
In the new paper, the UCSF team describes how yeast cells ferry just the right amount of mitochondria along a network of protein tracks and molecular motors into the young yeastlings, which bud off their mother like mini-me's.
Mothers are literally turning their daughters into mini-me's by providing them with much more clothes than what they give to their sons.
And Lowe is confident he will be the best of Britain's little big men in Stoke when a mountain of boxing 'Mini-Me's' walk tall on the bill.
JUST LISTEN TO THE OUTRAGED CHORUSES OF "APPEASEMENT" provoked by calls to diplomacy, as if all of today's global clashes could be reduced to mini-me's of Chamberlain's Munich (and recall that Chamberlain's failure in 1938 runs directly from 1919's Treaty of Versailles, when retribution, not reconciliation, won the diplomatic day).
Her revisionist view starts not with the store-bought urinal or typewriter cover, but with their handmade mini-me's, cunningly packaged in Duchamp's Boite-en-valise, 1935-41; with the small, unequivocally genital "erotic objects" he produced in the '50s; and with the full-scale artisan-produced copies of the readymades the artist authorized for museum display during the '60s (a clever inclusion here is the technical drawing for one of these redo's, approvingly inscribed OK MARCEL DUCHAMP).