minister

(redirected from Ministers of religion)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

min·is·ter

 (mĭn′ĭ-stər)
n.
1.
a. One who is authorized to perform religious functions in a Christian church, especially a Protestant church.
b. Roman Catholic Church The superior in certain orders.
2. A high officer of state appointed to head an executive or administrative department of government.
3. An authorized diplomatic representative of a government, usually ranking next below an ambassador.
4. A person serving as an agent for another by carrying out specified orders or functions.
v. min·is·tered, min·is·ter·ing, min·is·ters
v.intr.
1. To attend to the wants and needs of others: Volunteers ministered to the homeless after the flood. See Synonyms at tend2.
2. To perform the functions of a cleric.
v.tr.
To administer or dispense (a sacrament, for example).

[Middle English ministre, from Old French, from Latin minister, servant; see mei- in Indo-European roots.]

minister

(ˈmɪnɪstə)
n
1. (Protestantism) (esp in Presbyterian and some Nonconformist Churches) a member of the clergy
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a person appointed to head a government department
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) any diplomatic agent accredited to a foreign government or head of state
4. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) short for minister plenipotentiary or envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary. See envoy11
5. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) Also called (in full): minister resident a diplomat ranking after an envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary
6. a person who attends to the needs of others, esp in religious matters
7. a person who acts as the agent or servant of a person or thing
vb
8. (often foll by: to) to attend to the needs (of); take care (of)
9. (tr) archaic to provide; supply
[C13: via Old French from Latin: servant; related to minus less]
ˈministerˌship n

min•is•ter

(ˈmɪn ə stər)

n.
1. a person authorized to conduct religious worship; member of the clergy; pastor.
2. a person authorized to administer sacraments, as at mass.
3. a person appointed to some high office of state, esp. to that of head of an administrative department.
4. a diplomatic representative, usu. ranking below an ambassador.
5. a person acting as the agent or instrument of another.
v.i.
6. to perform the functions of a religious minister.
7. to give service, care, or aid: to minister to the hungry.
[1250–1300; (n.) Middle English (< Old French menistre) < Latin minister servant =minis-, variant of minus a lesser amount (see minor) + -ter n. suffix]

minister


Past participle: ministered
Gerund: ministering

Imperative
minister
minister
Present
I minister
you minister
he/she/it ministers
we minister
you minister
they minister
Preterite
I ministered
you ministered
he/she/it ministered
we ministered
you ministered
they ministered
Present Continuous
I am ministering
you are ministering
he/she/it is ministering
we are ministering
you are ministering
they are ministering
Present Perfect
I have ministered
you have ministered
he/she/it has ministered
we have ministered
you have ministered
they have ministered
Past Continuous
I was ministering
you were ministering
he/she/it was ministering
we were ministering
you were ministering
they were ministering
Past Perfect
I had ministered
you had ministered
he/she/it had ministered
we had ministered
you had ministered
they had ministered
Future
I will minister
you will minister
he/she/it will minister
we will minister
you will minister
they will minister
Future Perfect
I will have ministered
you will have ministered
he/she/it will have ministered
we will have ministered
you will have ministered
they will have ministered
Future Continuous
I will be ministering
you will be ministering
he/she/it will be ministering
we will be ministering
you will be ministering
they will be ministering
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been ministering
you have been ministering
he/she/it has been ministering
we have been ministering
you have been ministering
they have been ministering
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been ministering
you will have been ministering
he/she/it will have been ministering
we will have been ministering
you will have been ministering
they will have been ministering
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been ministering
you had been ministering
he/she/it had been ministering
we had been ministering
you had been ministering
they had been ministering
Conditional
I would minister
you would minister
he/she/it would minister
we would minister
you would minister
they would minister
Past Conditional
I would have ministered
you would have ministered
he/she/it would have ministered
we would have ministered
you would have ministered
they would have ministered

minister

A government officer who heads a department.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.minister - a person authorized to conduct religious worshipminister - a person authorized to conduct religious worship; "clergymen are usually called ministers in Protestant churches"
clergyman, man of the cloth, reverend - a member of the clergy and a spiritual leader of the Christian Church
ministrant - someone who serves as a minister
2.minister - a person appointed to a high office in the governmentminister - a person appointed to a high office in the government; "Minister of Finance"
cabinet minister - a person who is a member of the cabinet
executive, executive director - a person responsible for the administration of a business
finance minister, minister of finance - the minister responsible for state finances
foreign minister, secretary of state - a government minister for foreign relations
3.minister - a diplomat representing one government to anotherminister - a diplomat representing one government to another; ranks below ambassador
diplomat, diplomatist - an official engaged in international negotiations
4.minister - the job of a head of a government department
public service - employment within a government system (especially in the civil service)
cabinet minister - the job of a senior minister who is a member of the cabinet
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
Verb1.minister - attend to the wants and needs of others; "I have to minister to my mother all the time"
attend, take care, look, see - take charge of or deal with; "Could you see about lunch?"; "I must attend to this matter"; "She took care of this business"
2.minister - work as a minister; "She is ministering in an old parish"
work - exert oneself by doing mental or physical work for a purpose or out of necessity; "I will work hard to improve my grades"; "she worked hard for better living conditions for the poor"

minister

noun
1. member of the government, secretary, politician, secretary of state, cabinet minister, political leader He was named minister of culture.
2. official, ambassador, diplomat, delegate, executive, administrator, envoy, cabinet member, office-holder, plenipotentiary He concluded a deal with the Danish minister in Washington.
3. clergyman, priest, divine, vicar, parson, preacher, pastor, chaplain, cleric, rector, curate, churchman, padre (informal), ecclesiastic His father was a Baptist minister.
verb
1. (often with to) attend, serve, tend, answer to, accommodate, take care of, cater to, pander to, administer to, be solicitous of For 44 years he had ministered to the poor and the sick.

minister

noun
A person ordained for service in a Christian church:
Informal: reverend.
phrasal verb
minister to
1. To have the care and supervision of:
Idioms: keep an eye on, look out for, take care of, take under one's wing.
2. To work and care for:
attend, do for, serve, wait on (or upon).
Translations
كَاهِنٌكاهِنوَزيروَزِيرٌيَسْهَر على، يَرْعى، يُساعِد
ministrpastorpečovatpomáhat-yně
ministerpræstsørge forhjælpe
ministeripappipalvelija
ministarsvećenik
menteri
hlynna aîklerkur, presturráîherra
大臣聖職者
목사장관
dvasininko pareigoskunigystėministerijaministrasministrų
gādātmācītājsministrs
minister
ministerministricaduhovnik
ministerpräst
พระผู้สอนศาสนารัฐมนตรี
bộ trưởngmục sư

minister

[ˈmɪnɪstəʳ]
A. N
1. (Pol) → ministro/a m/f, secretario/a m/f (Mex)
Prime Ministerprimer(a) ministro/a m/f
the Minister for Educationel/la Ministro/a de Educación
2. (Rel) → pastor(a) m/f, clérigo/a m/f CHURCHES OF ENGLAND/SCOTLAND
B. VI to minister to sbatender a algn
to minister to sb's needsatender or satisfacer las necesidades de algn

minister

[ˈmɪnɪstər]
n
(British) (in government)ministre m/f
(= priest) → pasteur m
vi
to minister to sb → donner ses soins à qn
to minister to sb's needs → pourvoir aux besoins de qn

minister

n
(Pol) → Minister(in) m(f)
(Eccl) → Pfarrer(in) m(f), → Pastor(in) m(f); good morning, ministerguten Morgen, Herr Pfarrer or Herr Pastor
vi to minister to somebodysich um jdn kümmern; to minister to somebody’s needs/wantsjds Bedürfnisse/Wünsche (acc)befriedigen; a ministering angel (liter)ein barmherziger Engel

minister

[ˈmɪnɪstəʳ]
1. n (Brit) (Pol) → ministro (Rel) → pastore m
Minister for Defence → Ministro della Difesa
2. vi to minister to (sick person) → assistere
to minister to sb's needs → provvedere ai bisogni di qn
ministering angel (fig) → angelo del paradiso

minister

(ˈministə) noun
1. a clergyman in certain branches of the Christian Church. He is a minister in the Presbyterian church.
2. (the title of) the head of any of the divisions or departments of a government. the Minister for Education.
verb
(with to) to give help (to). She ministered to his needs.
ministerial (miniˈstiəriəl) adjective
of or concerning ministers. ministerial duties.
ˈministryplural ˈministries noun
1. the profession, duties or period of service of a minister of religion. His ministry lasted for fifteen years.
2. a department of government or the building where its employees work. the Transport Ministry.

minister

كَاهِنٌ, وَزِيرٌ ministr, pastor minister, præst Geistlicher, Minister ιερέας, υπουργός ministro, pastor ministeri, pappi ministre, pasteur ministar, svećenik ministro, sacerdote 大臣, 聖職者 목사, 장관 minister, predikant minister, prest duchowny, minister ministro, pastor министр, священник minister, präst พระผู้สอนศาสนา, รัฐมนตรี bakan, vaiz bộ trưởng, mục sư 牧师, 部长

minister

n. ministro; pastor.
References in classic literature ?
She thought that one of the boys ought perhaps to be a priest, but said nothing to her husband, who was a republican, and hated the "crows," as he called the ministers of religion.
Even after the war, ministers of religion were seriously urging observance not only to God but to the frugal vegetarian diet.
Meanwhile, ministers of religion can address people at their local level and ask them to contribute to the restoration of what has been lost and destroyed.
Company directors and ministers of religion, as well as anyone who earns more than PS100,000 in a year, are also required to complete tax returns.
Changes to Tier 2 visas - for general work, for sportspeople and for ministers of religion - will take effect from the spring of 2016, These visas are intended to fill gaps in the UK's labour market, and there are fears these gaps in the health service may grow wider.
However, as ministers of religion are remunerated by the State, the law makes a distinction between recognised religions obtaining state financing and other religious groups that merely enjoy religious freedom without obtaining any material support.
He further argued that any attempt to use ministers of religion to get men to enlist in the forces should be vigorously be resisted.
NOW YOU LOT LISTEN TO ME Ministers of religion in their training are taught never to talk down to the people in the pew.
Does not this involve the principle of a national establishment, applicable to a provision for a religious worship for the Constituent as well as of the representative Body, approved by the majority, and conducted by Ministers of religion paid by the entire nation.
Ministers of religion have improved their image by 1 percentage point, to 44 percent.
We need parents and teachers who instil from birth the difference between right and wrong: scoutmasters, successors of Baden-Powell who inspire the concept of service to God, King and Country, a good deed a day; ministers of religion to preach love thy neighbour; judges who can dispense justice; social workers and politicians who can assess it all and relate it to and from the public.
Topics include rock art, scripts, and proto-scripts in Africa; the introduction of alphabets to Mexican tlahcuilos (scribes) of the 16th century; representations of geographical knowledge of Ethiopia in the 16th and 17th centuries; literary-historical polemic in colonial Cape Town circa 1880-1910; Mapuche-Tehuelche Spanish writing and Argentinian-Chilean expansion during the 19th century; literacy and land practices at the Bay of Natal colony; black history and the Afro-Cuban codex of Jose Antonio Aponte; ministers of religion and written culture at the Cape of Good Hope in the 18th century; and occurrences and eclipses of the myth of Ulysses in Latin American culture.

Full browser ?