Miocene

(redirected from Miocene period)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Miocene period: Paleogene Period, Cretaceous period

Mi·o·cene

 (mī′ə-sēn′)
adj.
Of, relating to, or being the epoch of geologic time from about 23 to 5.3 million years ago, the fourth epoch of the Tertiary Period. It is characterized by the spread of grasses and grazing mammals. See Table at geologic time.
n.
The Miocene Epoch.

[Greek meiōn, less; see mei- in Indo-European roots + -cene.]

Miocene

(ˈmaɪəˌsiːn)
adj
(Geological Science) of, denoting, or formed in the fourth epoch of the Tertiary period, between the Oligocene and Pliocene epochs, which lasted for 19 million years
n
(Geological Science) the Miocene this epoch or rock series
[C19: from Greek meiōn less + -cene]

Mi•o•cene

(ˈmaɪ əˌsin)
Geol. adj.
1. noting or pertaining to an epoch of the Tertiary Period, occurring from 25 million to 10 million years ago, when grazing mammals became widespread.
n.
2. the Miocene Epoch or Series.
[1832; mio- (< Greek meíōn less) + -cene]

Mi·o·cene

(mī′ə-sēn′)
The fourth epoch of the Tertiary Period, from about 24 to 5 million years ago, characterized by the development of grasses and grazing mammals. See Chart at geologic time.
Pleistocene, Pliocene, Miocene, Oligocene - Pleistocene means "most recent," Pliocene means "more recent," Miocene means "moderately recent," and Oligocence means "but a little recent."
See also related terms for recent.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Miocene - from 25 million to 13 million years agoMiocene - from 25 million to 13 million years ago; appearance of grazing mammals
Tertiary, Tertiary period - from 63 million to 2 million years ago
Translations

Miocene

[ˈmaɪəsiːn]
A. ADJmioceno
B. Nmioceno m
References in periodicals archive ?
The island was formed between 11.6 and 5.3 million years ago due to pressure from shifting plates during the Miocene period. On the northern coast of the island, cliffs from this period still exist and the ancient sandy and chalky sediment layers in the rock remain visible.
They traced the mother of all citrus to the southeastern foothills of the Himalayas in the late Miocene period, study co-author Guohong Wu of the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute told AFP.
Led by Dr Mark Beech and discussing how the Emirati landscape was formed over the millennia and highlighting the Al Dhafra Region, where geological deposits tell the story of life during the late Miocene period, at Al Ain Municipality Theatre, 10am.