myriad

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myr·i·ad

 (mĭr′ē-əd)
adj.
1. Constituting a very large, indefinite number; innumerable: the myriad fish in the ocean.
2. Composed of numerous diverse elements or facets: the myriad life of the metropolis.
n.
1. A large, indefinite number: a myriad of microorganisms in the pond; myriads of stars in the galaxy.
2. Archaic Ten thousand.

[Greek mūrias, mūriad-, ten thousand, from mūrios, countless.]
Usage Note: Throughout most of its history in English myriad was used as a noun, as in a myriad of reasons. In the 1800s, it began to be used in poetry as an adjective, as in myriad dreams. Both usages in English are acceptable, as in Samuel Taylor Coleridge's "Myriad myriads of lives." This poetic, adjectival use became so well entrenched generally that many people came to consider it as the only correct use. In fact, however, both uses are acceptable today.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

myriad

(ˈmɪrɪəd)
adj
innumerable
n
1. (also used in plural) a large indefinite number
2. archaic ten thousand
[C16: via Late Latin from Greek murias ten thousand]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

myr•i•ad

(ˈmɪr i əd)

n.
1. an indefinitely great number of persons or things.
2. ten thousand.
adj.
3. of an indefinitely great number; innumerable.
4. having innumerable phases, aspects, variations, etc.
[1545–55; < Greek mȳriad-, s. of mȳriás ten thousand]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Myriad

 a countless mumber of persons, animals, or things; specifically, a group of 10,000.
Examples: myriad eyes, 1830; of horses, 1803; of lambs, 1817; of lives, 1800; of men, 1555; of people, 1660; of precedent, 1860; of sundry cases, 1570.
Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.myriad - a large indefinite number; "he faced a myriad of details"
large indefinite amount, large indefinite quantity - an indefinite quantity that is above the average in size or magnitude
2.myriad - the cardinal number that is the product of ten and one thousandmyriad - the cardinal number that is the product of ten and one thousand
large integer - an integer equal to or greater than ten
Adj.1.myriad - too numerous to be countedmyriad - too numerous to be counted; "incalculable riches"; "countless hours"; "an infinite number of reasons"; "innumerable difficulties"; "the multitudinous seas"; "myriad stars"; "untold thousands"
incalculable - not capable of being computed or enumerated
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

myriad

noun
1. multitude, millions, scores, host, thousands, army, sea, mountain, flood, a million, a thousand, swarm, horde They face a myriad of problems bringing up children.
adjective
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

myriad

adjective
Amounting to or consisting of a large, indefinite number:
Idiom: quite a few.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
miríada
myriade
loendamatu
lukematonlukematon määrälukuisamyriadisuunnaton määrä
aragrúimýgrúturógrynniótalurmull
een groot aantal
vạn

myriad

[ˈmɪrɪəd] (frm)
A. ADJ a myriad fliesun sinnúmero or una miríada de moscas
B. Nmiríada f
the myriad of problems we facela miríada de problemas a la que nos enfrentamos
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

myriad

[ˈmɪriəd]
nmyriade f
a myriad of problems → une myriade de problèmes
adj (= countless) → innombrable
in all its myriad forms → sous toutes ses diverses formes
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

myriad

nMyriade f; a myriad ofMyriaden von
adj (= innumerable)unzählige
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

myriad

[ˈmɪrɪəd] nmiriade f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Qian, "MiRiad roles for microRNAs in cardiac development and regeneration," Cells, vol.
This book is designed to spotlight the miriad of problems women and girls face in the world today through real stories of human rights abuses.
Hyatt, who is the Director of Manchester Institute for Research and Innovation in Art and Design (MIRIAD) at the university, says that pictures of those 'fairies' are now installed in The Whitaker Gallery, Rossendale.
The 53 year-old Director of Manchester Institute for Research and Innovation in Art and Design (MIRIAD) has faced criticism that he may be away with the fairies.
The 53-year-old Director of Manchester Institute for Research and Innovation in Art and Design (MIRIAD) was out taking photographs of his local landscape and when he enlarged his shots he noticed a cluster of tiny flying creatures, News.com.au reported.