mirror neuron

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mirror neuron

n.
A neuron found in the cerebral cortex that is active when one performs an action or when one witnesses another performing the same action, and whose function is thought to be involved in acquiring language and the ability to empathize.
References in periodicals archive ?
When fired, mirror neurons prompt us to attune to and mirror other people's behaviour.
You see, we have these things called mirror neurons, which fire both when we act and when we observe the same action performed by another person.
Now, by studying rats, researchers at the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience (NIN) in Amsterdam have identified that the ability to feel the pain of others has to do with "mirror neurons" in the ACC.
An example of this process is represented by mirror neurons: it has been known for some time that the same neurons engaged in planning a hand movement are also used when observing the hand movement of others.
This is also why couples so often say to each other, "Look at me when I'm talking to you." Eye contact tells our mirror neurons to fire, and when they do, the result is better performance and communication.
[31-33] Movement-related mirror neurons along with motor neuron are bimodal visuomotor neurons found in the frontal and parietal lobes that are active during action observation, mental stimulation (imagery), and action execution.
The mirror system has been the subject of electrophysiological studies for more than 25 years since the discovery of 'mirror neurons' in the macaque brain.
In a 2007 Psychological Bulletin paper, psychologists from the University of California, San Diego attributed an individual's lack of empathy or theory of mind to dysfunctional mirror neurons. "Unlike inanimate objects, humans have the distinct property of being 'like me' in the eyes of the observer," they noted.
One possibility is that tutorial videos take full advantage of mirror neurons, which are a substrate for humans to imitate.
It comes down to neuroscience and the mirror neurons in your brain.
In the study, which was published in Frontiers in Integrative Neuroscience, Iacoboni and colleagues analyzed mirror neurons, brain cells that respond equally when someone performs an action or simply watches someone else perform the same action.
We can argue for the evidence that the improved UE functions with AOE in present study might be associated with activation of mirror neurons. The intact cortical regions in the majority of participants indicated that the core MNS (inferior frontal gyrus, ventral premotor cortex, inferior parietal lobule) [11] might have contributed to enhanced mirror neurons activity.