miscegenation

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Related to Miscegnation: social Darwinism

mis·ceg·e·na·tion

 (mĭ-sĕj′ə-nā′shən, mĭs′ĭ-jə-)
n.
Cohabitation, sexual relations, marriage, or interbreeding involving persons of different races, especially in historical contexts as a transgression of the law.

[Latin miscēre, to mix; see meik- in Indo-European roots + genus, race; see genə- in Indo-European roots + -ation.]

mis·ceg′e·na′tion·al adj.

miscegenation

(ˌmɪsɪdʒɪˈneɪʃən)
n
(Genetics) interbreeding of races, esp where differences of pigmentation are involved
[C19: from Latin miscēre to mingle + genus race]
miscegenetic adj

mis•ceg•e•na•tion

(mɪˌsɛdʒ əˈneɪ ʃən, ˌmɪs ɪ dʒə-)

n.
1. marriage or cohabitation between a man and woman of different races, esp. between a black and a white person.
2. interbreeding between members of different races.
[1864, Amer.; < Latin miscē(re) to mix + gen(us) race, stock, species + -ation]
mis`ce•ge•net′ic (-ˈnɛt ɪk) adj.

miscegenation

1. the interbreeding of members of different races.
2. cohabitation or marriage between a man and woman of different races, especially, in the U.S., between a Negro and a white person.
3. the mixing or mixture of races by interbreeding.
See also: Race
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.miscegenation - reproduction by parents of different races (especially by white and non-white persons)
facts of life, procreation, reproduction, breeding - the sexual activity of conceiving and bearing offspring
Translations
raseblanding

miscegenation

[ˌmɪsɪdʒɪˈneɪʃən] N (frm) → mestizaje m, cruce m de razas

miscegenation

mis·ce·ge·na·tion

n. mestizaje, cruzamiento de razas o de culturas.
References in periodicals archive ?
Finally, both texts have as a primary theme the fear of too much mixing, which is directly connected to the theme of miscegnation. Despite these similarities, the novels arrive at significantly different conclusions.
The product of miscegnation, which was proscribed by Louisiana's Code Noir, they claimed an elite social status because they were descended from the original European settlers of Louisiana.
In chapter 5, Ikeya examines the increasing outcry in colonial Burma against intermarriages and miscegnation between local women and non-Burmese men, involving colonists themselves, immigrants and migrant workers.