mise-en-scène

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mise-en-scène

(mi zɑ̃ˈsɛn)

n., pl. -scènes (-ˈsɛns, -ˈsɛn)
1. the process of setting a stage, with regard to placement of actors, scenery, properties, etc.
2. the stage setting or scenery of a play.
3. surroundings; environment.
[1830–35; < French mise en scène]
References in classic literature ?
The man who insatiably cries da capo to himself and to the whole of his mise-en-scene, must be in a position to desire every incident in his life to be repeated, not once, but again and again eternally.
This essay aims at systematically quantifying and explaining how Hong has constructed his mise-en-scene over the course of his career and analyzes the meanings of Hong's visual approach.
The still, austere mise-en-scene common to slow movies deals with death, blankness, emptiness, silence, motion (however brief or limited it may be) and place, in a distinct manner.
The fest website lauded the film for "its profound reflection on sin, guilt, faith-rooted in a specific historical and political context, highlighted by a sophisticated mise-en-scene.
Multihyphenate French-Canadian artist and Cirque du Soleil alumnus Martin Villeneuve here adapts his eponymous graphic novels, which sure look and sound like they belong on the bigscreen, even if the mise-en-scene is occasionally somewhat fuzzy.
A fruitful examination of mise-en-scene may be based on the director's stylistic approach.
In many of its sections, it so much resembles the gritty mise-en-scene from On the Waterfront, you'd practically expect to see a bloodied Marlon Brando staggering towards one of the piers with a horde of longshoremen in tow.
What emerged instead was Francois's intuitive ability to marshal a great number of objects into a seemingly coherent (if still ambiguous) mise-en-scene, as well as his penchant for creating sculptures that have a tactile quality (an eagle made of ice dipped in black ink; the wood and spent charcoal in Contamination, 2005; the plaster enveloping the bristles in Black Broom, 2005), two characteristics that unexpectedly brought to mind Gabriel Orozco.
The Man About Town, danced with superb and unusual panache by Jeffrey Stanton, flirts with anyone in a skirt, from The Wife to a chamber maid, in the 1913 hotel that is the ballet's mise-en-scene.
Gibbs starts by defining mise-en-scene and proceeds to quickly outline the various elements that contribute to mise-en-scene: lighting, costume, colour, props, decor, action and performance, use of space and camera position.
But Campbell's fundamental study went about as far as one could go in terms of establishing a viable mise-en-scene for a somewhat elusive subject.
Integrating Dzama's drawings into the feverish, downright horny dream-states of the fictional artist and his art, dawson's carnival of scratchy black-and-white mise-en-scene is ruptured when the drawings occasionally come to life in living, if rather pale, colour.