Mishnaic Hebrew


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Related to Mishnaic Hebrew: Rabbinic Hebrew

Mishnaic Hebrew

n.
The Hebrew language as used from the second to the tenth century ad. Also called Rabbinic Hebrew.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is possible that rishfei kashet actually refers to the sparks produced by the bow, since in Mishnaic Hebrew and Aramaic Resheph means "spark.
The author also judiciously relates to extra-biblical Hebrew, including Qumran and Mishnaic Hebrew.
Related to Classical Hebrew in the way the Hellenistic koine and Late or Vulgar Latin are related to Classical Greek and Classical Latin, Mishnaic Hebrew continued to be spoken until the destruction of the Second Temple in the first century CE.
Among the topics are Mishnah Baba Metsia 7:7 and the relationship of Mishnaic Hebrew to northern biblical Hebrew, Tosefta Ma'aser Sheni 1:4--the rabbis and Roman civic coinage in late antique Palestine, Jerusalem Talmud Sanhedrin 2,6 (20c)--the demise of King Solomon and Roman imperial propaganda in late antiquity, polychromy and the Jerusalem temple in late antiquity, and the Rehov inscriptions and rabbinic literature.
Bar-Asher has collected 25 of his published studies that deal with three divisions of the classical Hebrew language: Biblical Hebrew, the Hebrew of the Dead Sea Scrolls, and Mishnaic Hebrew.
Under the influence of Aramaic and other factors, Hebrew continued to decline in the post-exilic period, according to this theory, until by the CE period the Mishnaic Hebrew of the Rabbis represents a thoroughly unclassical form of Hebrew, perhaps an Aramaised form of Hebrew.
Yet in Mishnaic Hebrew (and in late biblical Hebrew), the Lamed Heh or ultima "h" verbs prevailed and penetrated into Lamed Aleph or ultima "a" verbs.
In the final chapter the question whether Mishnaic Hebrew was a Schulsprache or a living language functions as a structuring device for much of the discussion.
Segal's most accessible statement of his position is to be found in his A Grammar of Mishnaic Hebrew (Oxford, 1927), pp.
10) Kohelet's language seems to reflect the transitional stage between late Biblical Hebrew and early Mishnaic Hebrew, and consequently the book is dated to the third century BCE.
Dor also proposes that the water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) is to be identified as being the animal signified in the Mishnaic Hebrew koy.
b) Admittedly, numerous studies have amply demonstrated that all the literary works found at Qumran evidently reflect linguistic innovations shared by other corpora of the Second Temple period (such as late BH on the one hand and Mishnaic Hebrew on the other) as well as direct dependence on--and borrowing of--biblical language and style.