misrender

misrender

(ˌmɪsˈrɛndə)
vb (tr)
to render imperfectly or wrongly
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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References in periodicals archive ?
Unlike Bahya, who admits to fallibility, Maimonides strictly warns his readers not to expound any of his esoteric interpretations lest they misrender his views.
It is thus common for government maps to misrender the suffix-taman ('valley') as -min, e.g., Eliptamin (sic) rather than Eliptaman, Baktamin rather than Baktaman, Seltamin rather than Seltaman, etc.
Estate planning malpractice claims call for an inquiry into whether the lawyer misrendered the donor's instructions.
The title of Richard Doddridge Blackmore's historical novel Lorna Doone (1869) is misrendered (252).
But Long did notice that my No Victory, No Peace misrendered Condoleezza Rice as "Condolezza." I had not noticed--perhaps because, being Italian (Lombard, not Florentine) and remembering too well her describing to me that her mother gave her that name by modifying the Italian musical term "con dolcezza," meaning "with sweetness," or "sweetly," I unconsciously singled the "e" Italian style.
Individual songs fare no better, however well-known: Sweeney Todd's "Not While I'm Around" becomes "Nothing's Gonna Harm You," and even Cats's ubiquitous "Memory" is misrendered as "Memories." To correct just a few of Clum's less glaring errors: Thelma Carpenter--not Theima Oliver--understudied Pearl Bailey in Hello, Dolly!; characters in Company do refer to Robert as "Bob"; and there are women in the cast of Pacific Overtures.
Then there is the misrendering of proper names, such as "Meanan" for Menam/Mae Nam, "Sian" for Siam, "Ata" for Atsi, "Nam" for Main and "Aka" for Akha; even the names of Indian anthropologists are sometimes misrendered, "S.C.
174 (on 11:4) 'cuando oye' (when he hears) misrenders ke-mashma'ah, a technical term meaning 'in the literal sense' (sc 'as heard').
Upon close examination, the matter of Duisberg's election typifies how Abraham also misrenders his sources in small ways that add up to large ones.
Brooks misrendered "praelevet" as "praevalebit." The line in the Vulgate is a Latin translation of a Greek translation of Hebrew scripture, but not the Old Testament.
This reviewer also noticed that A in verses 39, 41, 48-50, 54 correctly translated sukra as T khu ba; while B always misrendered it as T.