Mississippi


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Related to Mississippi: Mississippi River

Mis·sis·sip·pi

 (mĭs′ĭ-sĭp′ē) Abbr. MS or Miss.
A state of the southeast United States. It was admitted as the 20th state in 1817. French settlers arrived in 1699, and the area became part of Louisiana. It passed to the British (1763-1779) and then to the Spanish before being ceded to the United States in 1783. The Mississippi Territory, organized in 1798 and enlarged in 1804 and 1813, also included the present state of Alabama. Jackson is the capital and the largest city.
Word History: In a letter from August 1863, Abraham Lincoln wrote, "the Father of Waters again goes unvexed to the sea," referring to General Grant's capture of Vicksburg, Mississippi. In the 1700s and 1800s, it was widely believed that the name Mississippi meant "Father of Waters," in a Native American language, and American writers often used the phrase Father of Waters as an alternate, more poetic appellation for the river. (Other mighty rivers, such as the Nile, had also been given this title in English literature before the Mississippi.) However, the name Mississippi actually comes from Ojibwa misi-sipi, meaning simply "big river." In 1666 French explorers somewhere in the western Great Lakes region encountered the Ojibwa name and rendered it as Messipi. The French then took the name with them as they went down the Big River to its delta, and it eventually superseded all the other names for the Big River used by local Indian tribes and by earlier Spanish explorers. Later, in 1798, Congress applied the Ojibwa name of the river to the territory of Mississippi, newly organized from lands inhabited by the Natchez, Choctaw, and Chickasaw.

Mississippi

(ˌmɪsɪˈsɪpɪ)
n
1. (Placename) a state of the southeastern US, on the Gulf of Mexico: consists of a largely forested undulating plain, with swampy regions in the northwest and on the coast, the Mississippi River forming the W border; cotton, rice, and oil. Capital: Jackson. Pop: 2 881 281 (2003 est). Area: 122 496 sq km (47 296 sq miles). Abbreviation: Miss or MS (with zip code)
2. (Placename) a river in the central US, rising in NW Minnesota and flowing generally south to the Gulf of Mexico through several mouths, known as the Passes: the second longest river in North America (after its tributary, the Missouri), with the third largest drainage basin in the world (after the Amazon and the Congo). Length: 3780 km (2348 miles)

Mis•sis•sip•pi

(ˌmɪs əˈsɪp i)

n.
1. a state in the S United States. 2,844,658; 47,716 sq. mi. (123,585 sq. km). Cap.: Jackson. Abbr.: MS, Miss.
2. a river flowing S from N Minnesota to the Gulf of Mexico: the principal river of the U.S. 2470 mi. (3975 km) long; from the headwaters of the Missouri to the Gulf of Mexico 3988 mi. (6418 km) long.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Mississippi - a major North American river and the chief river of the United StatesMississippi - a major North American river and the chief river of the United States; rises in northern Minnesota and flows southward into the Gulf of Mexico
U.S.A., United States, United States of America, US, USA, America, the States, U.S. - North American republic containing 50 states - 48 conterminous states in North America plus Alaska in northwest North America and the Hawaiian Islands in the Pacific Ocean; achieved independence in 1776
2.Mississippi - a state in the Deep South on the gulf of MexicoMississippi - a state in the Deep South on the gulf of Mexico; one of the Confederate States during the American Civil War
siege of Vicksburg, Vicksburg - a decisive battle in the American Civil War (1863); after being besieged for nearly seven weeks the Confederates surrendered
U.S.A., United States, United States of America, US, USA, America, the States, U.S. - North American republic containing 50 states - 48 conterminous states in North America plus Alaska in northwest North America and the Hawaiian Islands in the Pacific Ocean; achieved independence in 1776
Gulf States - a region of the United States comprising states bordering the Gulf of Mexico; Alabama and Florida and Louisiana and Mississippi and Texas
Confederacy, Confederate States, Confederate States of America, Dixie, Dixieland, South - the southern states that seceded from the United States in 1861
South - the region of the United States lying to the south of the Mason-Dixon line
Deep South - the southeastern region of the United States: South Carolina and Georgia and Alabama and Mississippi and Louisiana; prior to the American Civil War all these states produced cotton and permitted slavery
Biloxi - an old town in southern Mississippi on the Gulf of Mexico
Columbus - a town in eastern Mississippi near the border with Alabama
Greenville - a town in western Mississippi on the Mississippi River to the north of Vicksburg
Hattiesburg - a town in southeast Mississippi
capital of Mississippi, Jackson - capital of the state of Mississippi on the Pearl River
Meridian - a town in eastern Mississippi
Natchez - a town in southwest Mississippi on the Mississippi River
Tupelo - a town in northeast Mississippi
Vicksburg - a town in western Mississippi on bluffs above the Mississippi River to the west of Jackson; focus of an important campaign during the American Civil War as the Union fought to control the Mississippi River and so to cut the Confederacy into two halves
Pearl River - a river in Mississippi that flows southward to the Gulf of Mexico
Tombigbee, Tombigbee River - a river that rises in northeastern Mississippi and flows southward through western Alabama to join the Alabama River and form the Mobile River
Yazoo, Yazoo River - a river that rises in west central Mississippi and flows southwest to empty into the Mississippi River above Vicksburg
Translations
Mississippi

Mississippi

[ˌmɪsɪˈsɪpɪ] NMisisipí m

Mississippi

nMississippi m

Mississippi

[ˌmɪsɪˈsɪpɪ] n (state) → Mississippi m; (river) the Mississippiil Mississippi
References in classic literature ?
Pontellier talked about her father's Mississippi plantation and her girlhood home in the old Kentucky bluegrass country.
The writer remembers to have been present at an interview between two chiefs of the Great Prairies west of the Mississippi, and when an interpreter was in attendance who spoke both their languages.
those tiger yellow creatures of his seemed all steel and whale-bone; like five trip-hammers they rose and fell with regular strokes of strength, which periodically started the boat along the water like a horizontal burst boiler out of a Mississippi steamer.
By my retentive memory of the hieroglyphics upon one Sperm Whale in particular, I was much struck with a plate representing the old Indian characters chiselled on the famous hieroglyphic palisades on the banks of the Upper Mississippi.
If all the broad land between the Mississippi and the Pacific becomes one great market for bodies and souls, and human property retains the locomotive tendencies of this nineteenth century, the trader and catcher may yet be among our aristocracy.
Soon after, I went to see a panorama of the Mississippi, and as I worked my way up the river in the light of today, and saw the steamboats wooding up, counted the rising cities, gazed on the fresh ruins of Nauvoo, beheld the Indians moving west across the stream, and, as before I had looked up the Moselle, now looked up the Ohio and the Missouri and heard the legends of Dubuque and of Wenona's Cliff--still thinking more of the future than of the past or present--I saw that this was a Rhine stream of a different kind; that the foundations of castles were yet to be laid, and the famous bridges were yet to be thrown over the river; and I felt that THIS WAS THE HEROIC AGE ITSELF, though we know it not, for the hero is commonly the simplest and obscurest of men.
The mammoth grand-stand was clothed in flags, streamers, and rich tapestries, and packed with several acres of small-fry tributary kings, their suites, and the British aristocracy; with our own royal gang in the chief place, and each and every individual a flashing prism of gaudy silks and velvets -- well, I never saw anything to begin with it but a fight between an Upper Mississippi sunset and the aurora borealis.
One evening on board a Mississippi steamboat, a boy of ten years lay asleep in a berth--a long, slim-legged boy, he was, encased in quite a short shirt; it was the first time he had ever made a trip on a steamboat, and so he was troubled, and scared, and had gone to bed with his head filled with impending snaggings, and explosions, and conflagrations, and sudden death.
Scene: The Mississippi Valley Time: Forty to fifty years ago
The scene of this chronicle is the town of Dawson's Landing, on the Missouri side of the Mississippi, half a day's journey, per steamboat, below St.
Petersburg, at a point where the Mississippi River was a trifle over a mile wide, there was a long, narrow, wooded island, with a shallow bar at the head of it, and this offered well as a ren- dezvous.
But anyway, he gets out by himself and mopes and thinks; and mostly he hunts for a lonesome place high up on the hill in the edge of the woods, and sets there and looks away off on the big Mississippi down there a-reaching miles and miles around the points where the timber looks smoky and dim it's so far off and still, and everything's so solemn it seems like everybody you've loved is dead and gone, and you 'most wish you was dead and gone too, and done with it all.

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