Mister


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Mis·ter

(mĭs′tər)
n.
1. Used as a courtesy title before the surname, full name, or professional title of a man, usually written in its abbreviated form: Mr. Jones; Mr. Secretary.
2. Used as the official term of address for certain US military personnel, such as warrant officers.
3. mister Informal Used as a form of address for a man: Watch your step, mister.
4. Informal One's husband or boyfriend: My mister says hello.

[Alteration of master.]

mister

(ˈmɪstə)
n
1. an informal form of address for a man
2. (Military) navy
a. the official form of address for subordinate or senior warrant officers
b. the official form of address for all officers in a merchant ship, other than the captain
c. US navy the official form of address used by the commanding officer to his officers, esp to the more junior
3. (Medicine) Brit the form of address for a surgeon
4. the form of address for officials holding certain positions: mister chairman.
vb
(tr) informal to call (someone) mister
[C16: variant of master]

Mister

(ˈmɪstə)
n
the full form of Mr

mis•ter

(ˈmɪs tər)

n.
1. (cap.) a title of respect prefixed to a man's name or position (usu. written Mr.).
2. (used by itself as an informal term of address to a man) Watch out, mister!
3. the title used in addressing a military warrant officer or any naval officer below the rank of commander.
4. Older Use. husband.
[1545–55; variant of master]

mister


Past participle: mistered
Gerund: mistering

Imperative
mister
mister
Present
I mister
you mister
he/she/it misters
we mister
you mister
they mister
Preterite
I mistered
you mistered
he/she/it mistered
we mistered
you mistered
they mistered
Present Continuous
I am mistering
you are mistering
he/she/it is mistering
we are mistering
you are mistering
they are mistering
Present Perfect
I have mistered
you have mistered
he/she/it has mistered
we have mistered
you have mistered
they have mistered
Past Continuous
I was mistering
you were mistering
he/she/it was mistering
we were mistering
you were mistering
they were mistering
Past Perfect
I had mistered
you had mistered
he/she/it had mistered
we had mistered
you had mistered
they had mistered
Future
I will mister
you will mister
he/she/it will mister
we will mister
you will mister
they will mister
Future Perfect
I will have mistered
you will have mistered
he/she/it will have mistered
we will have mistered
you will have mistered
they will have mistered
Future Continuous
I will be mistering
you will be mistering
he/she/it will be mistering
we will be mistering
you will be mistering
they will be mistering
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been mistering
you have been mistering
he/she/it has been mistering
we have been mistering
you have been mistering
they have been mistering
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been mistering
you will have been mistering
he/she/it will have been mistering
we will have been mistering
you will have been mistering
they will have been mistering
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been mistering
you had been mistering
he/she/it had been mistering
we had been mistering
you had been mistering
they had been mistering
Conditional
I would mister
you would mister
he/she/it would mister
we would mister
you would mister
they would mister
Past Conditional
I would have mistered
you would have mistered
he/she/it would have mistered
we would have mistered
you would have mistered
they would have mistered
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mister - a form of address for a manMister - a form of address for a man    
form of address, title of respect, title - an identifying appellation signifying status or function: e.g. `Mr.' or `General'; "the professor didn't like his friends to use his formal title"
Translations
سَيِّد
pan
hr
sinjoro
herra
misteris
kungsmisters
domn
gospod

mister

[ˈmɪstəʳ] N
1. (gen abbr Mr) → señor m (gen abbr Sr.)
2. (in direct address) hey, mister!¡oiga, usted!

mister

[ˈmɪstər] nMonsieur m
see also Mr

mister

n
(abbr Mr) → Herr m; (on envelope) → Herrn; (with politicians’ names etc) not translated
(inf: = sir) not translated; please, mister, can you tell me …?können Sie mir bitte sagen …?; now listen here, misterhören Sie mal her

mister

[ˈmɪstəʳ] n (fam) → signore m
see also Mr

Mister

(ˈmistə) noun
(abbreviated to Mr when written) a polite title given to a male adult, either in writing or in speech. Good morning, Mr Smith; Ask Mr Jones.

mister

n. señor.
References in classic literature ?
Not until Mister Haggin abruptly picked him up under one arm and stepped into the sternsheets of the waiting whaleboat, did Jerry dream that anything untoward was to happen to him.
That way, Mister Blasted Shut-up,--that's what I mean
So they turned and went around the bend in the passage, where they were out of sight of the cave and Mister Yoop could not hear them.
Durdles then gives the Dean a good evening, and adding, as he puts his hat on, 'You'll find me at home, Mister Jarsper, as agreed, when you want me; I'm a-going home to clean myself,' soon slouches out of sight.
Oh, really, Master Copperfield,' he rejoined - 'I beg your pardon, Mister Copperfield, but the other comes so natural, I don't like that you should put a constraint upon yourself to ask a numble person like me to your ouse.
My word, Mister O'Hara, they know about you and the lama for fifty miles - the common people.
It seems to me, mister," said he, "that you are gettin' set on my Ettie.
I wouldn't like to be the grandchild of a pinched grandfather, would you, Mister Sir?
Good morning, mister," said Dominicus, when within speaking distance.
Again he played as a puppy on the broad verandas of MISTER Haggin's plantation bungalow at Meringe; or, with Jerry, stalked the edges of the jungle down by the river-bank to spy upon the crocodiles; or, learning from MISTER Haggin and Bob, and patterning after Biddy and Terrence, to consider black men as lesser and despised gods who must for ever be kept strictly in their places.
A1ways MISTER Roberts this, an' MISTER Roberts that--all kinds of ceremony so as to make me not forget they consider themselves better 'n me.
A Mamma, fair and fat; three young Misses, fair and fat; two young Misters, fair and fat; and a Papa, the fairest and the fattest of all, who is a mighty merchant, up to his eyes in gold--a fine man once, but seeing that he has got a naked head and two chins, fine no longer at the present time.