SWAK

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SWAK

abbr.
sealed with a kiss
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

SWAK

or S.W.A.K.

(as initials or swæk)
sealed with a kiss.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
It has been reported by Hazrath Abdulla bin Masood RA that the miswak should be held in such a manner that the small finger be placed towards the bottom of the miswak and the thumb just below the portion which is placed in the mouth and remaining fingers at the top of the miswak.
Ranging from Miswak and rassagir (loan-words) to 'speed breaker' (coinage) and gymkhana (hybrid) a vast variety of Anglicized lexical items is found in Pakistani English newspapers.
Among the big players are PT Unilever Tbk; PT Ultra Prima Abadi; PT Lion Wings; PT Enzym Bioteknologi Internusa; PT Filma Utama Soap; and PT Miswak Utama.
Volunteers set up checkpoints on all the city's main roundabouts and offered passersby over a 1,000 Ramadan gifts containing dates, miswak (a teeth cleaning twig) and brochures highlighting the dangers of smoking.
###hygiene devices, many Moslems still prefer to use the natural Miswak.3
You cleaned your teeth as much as possible with a miswak (a twig of a specific tree which is said to be good for oral hygiene) and you used it vigorously so as to expel all the foreign elements from your throat .
There is another longish shot showing the woman surrounded by a herd of apparently amused men (among them a half dressed man with a miswak to his teeth), indulging in irrelevant dialogue directed at the woman.
For instance, plain tiger butterflies lay their eggs on calotropis plants, peacock pensy and blue pensy butterflies on rualiea, salmon Arab on miswak, lemon butterfly on citrus plants and the pioneer butterfly on Cassia.
For example, the use of the "Miswak" (a teeth cleaning stick), and the ritual shaving of heads by male Muslims after completing the annual pilgrimage or hajj in Mecca may carry the risk of infection if proper cautions are not taken (Department of Preventive Medicine and Field Epidemiology Training Program Ministry of Health/Riyadh, 1998 ).