mitosis

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mitosis

mi·to·sis

 (mī-tō′sĭs)
n. pl. mi·to·ses (-sēz) Biology
1. The process in cell division by which the nucleus divides, typically consisting of four stages, prophase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase, and normally resulting in two new nuclei, each of which contains a complete copy of the parental chromosomes. Also called karyokinesis.
2. The entire process of cell division including division of the nucleus and the cytoplasm.

[Greek mitos, warp thread + -osis.]

mi·tot′ic (-tŏt′ĭk) adj.
mi·tot′i·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

mitosis

(maɪˈtəʊsɪs; mɪ-)
n
(Biology) a method of cell division, in which the nucleus divides into daughter nuclei, each containing the same number of chromosomes as the parent nucleus. Compare prophase, metaphase, anaphase, telophase, meiosis1
[C19: from New Latin, from Greek mitos thread]
mitotic adj
miˈtotically adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mi•to•sis

(maɪˈtoʊ sɪs)

n.
the usual method of cell division, characterized by the resolving of the chromatin of the nucleus into a threadlike form that condenses into chromosomes, each of which separates longitudinally into two parts, one part of each chromosome being retained in each of the two new daughter cells. Compare meiosis (def. 1).
[1885–90; < German Mitose (1882) < Greek mít(os) a thread + German -ose -osis]
mi•tot•ic (maɪˈtɒt ɪk) adj.
mi•tot′i•cal•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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mitosis
During prophase, chromosomes thicken, centrioles move to opposite ends of a cell, and the membrane around the nucleus disappears. In metaphase, a spindle is formed to which the centromeres attach, lining up the chromosomes at the center. In anaphase, the chromatids split, and the chromosomes from each chromatid pair move to opposite ends of the spindle. In telophase, the spindle disappears, and a nuclear membrane forms around the chromosomes at each end of the cell. The cytoplasm of the dividing cell begins to separate during mitosis and ends after division of the nucleus is complete. During interphase, the daughter cells develop and the chromosomes duplicate.

mi·to·sis

(mī-tō′sĭs)
The process in cell division in which the nucleus divides to produce two new nuclei, each having the same number and type of chromosomes as the original. Early in mitosis, each chromosome duplicates itself to form two identical strands (called chromatids), which then line up along the center of the cell by attaching to the fibers of the cell spindle. The pairs of chromatids then separate, each strand of a pair moving to an opposite end of the cell. When a new membrane forms around each of the two groups of chromosomes, division of the nucleus is complete. The four main phases of mitosis are prophase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase.
Usage Mitosis and meiosis are easily confused, since both words refer to processes of cell division. Most cells have two full sets of chromosomes and are technically called diploid cells. When such a cell divides, it must first duplicate its chromosomes so as to produce two daughter cells that are also diploid. This type of cell division is called mitosis, and all somatic cells—that is, cells used for the maintenance, functioning, and growth of an organism—reproduce in this way. By contrast, reproductive cells, or gametes, are created by another kind of cell division, called meiosis. Meiosis also starts out by duplicating the chromosomes, but there are two divisions instead of one, with the result that four daughter cells are produced rather than two. Since the number of chromosomes is halved with each division, each daughter cell has just a single set of chromosomes and is called a haploid cell. During reproduction, the union of a female gamete with a male gamete restores the two full sets of chromosomes in a new organism.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

mitosis

the normal process of cell division. — mitotic, adj.
See also: Biology
the normal process of cell division. — mitotic, adj.
See also: Cells
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

mitosis

1. A type of cell division that produces two cells identical to the parent cell.
2. Ordinary cell division in which both daughter cells have as many chromosomes as there were in the parent cell. See meiosis.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mitosis - cell division in which the nucleus divides into nuclei containing the same number of chromosomesmitosis - cell division in which the nucleus divides into nuclei containing the same number of chromosomes
cell division, cellular division - the process in reproduction and growth by which a cell divides to form daughter cells
cytokinesis - organic process consisting of the division of the cytoplasm of a cell following karyokinesis bringing about the separation into two daughter cells
karyokinesis - organic process consisting of the division of the nucleus of a cell during mitosis or meiosis
metaphase - the second stage of mitosis
prophase - the first stage of mitosis
telophase - the final stage of mitosis
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
Mitose

mitosis

[maɪˈtəʊsɪs] n (Bio) → mitosi f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

mi·to·sis

n. mitosis, división celular que da lugar a nuevas células y reemplaza tejidos lesionados.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Five slides were evaluated per treatment, with approximately 500-800 meristematic cells analyzed per slide, and the different stages of mitotic division as well as possible chromosomal and nuclear alterations were recorded.
At a temperature of 26[degrees]C, the first mitotic division occurred after 15 min in 54% of the eggs and after 25 min in 84%, showing a gradual increase over time.
They indicate cell anomalies on different levels and they may also give rise to postzygotic genetic abnormalities, such as mosaicism, which arise during mitotic division. There seem to be many different factors associated with these abnormal cleavage patterns, but there is a lack of data regarding what the causes are for certain types.
At this stage, the uninucleate microspore underwent an asymmetric mitotic division (microspore mitosis) to give rise to two cells, but the vegetative cell and the generative cell was not observed.
These findings could be extrapolated to the fetal heart to justify increased mitotic division in the RV (21,32).
However, when this type of helminthiasis noticeably increases, the number of cells in a state of mitotic division is not observed.
It is thought using [alpha]-monobromonaphthalene method for chromosome analysis may have negatively affected the roots tips during pretreatment with monobromonaphthalene causing some internal rearrangements in the root tips that caused difficulty in observing and counting the chromosomes at the time of mitotic division of root cells.