mitzvah

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mitz·vah

 (mĭts′və)
n. pl. mitz·voth (-vōt′, -vōs′) or mitz·vahs
1.
a. A commandment of the Jewish law.
b. The fulfillment of such a commandment.
2. A worthy deed.

[Hebrew miṣwâ, from ṣiwwâ, to command; see ṣwy in Semitic roots.]

mitzvah

(ˈmɪtsvə; Hebrew mitsˈvɑ)
n, pl -vahs or -voth (Hebrew -ˈvɔt)
1. (Judaism) a commandment or precept, esp one found in the Bible
2. (Judaism) a good deed
[from Hebrew: commandment]

mitz•vah

or mits•vah

(mitsˈvɑ, mɪts-; Eng. ˈmɪts və)

n., pl. -voth, -vot, -vos (-ˈvɔt)
Eng. -vahs. Hebrew.
1. any of the collection of 613 commandments or precepts in the Bible and additional ones of rabbinic origin that relate chiefly to the religious and moral conduct of Jews.
2. any good or praiseworthy deed.
[< Hebrew miṣwāh commandment]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mitzvah - (Judaism) a precept or commandment of the Jewish lawmitzvah - (Judaism) a precept or commandment of the Jewish law
commandment, precept, teaching - a doctrine that is taught; "the teachings of religion"; "he believed all the Christian precepts"
Judaism - the monotheistic religion of the Jews having its spiritual and ethical principles embodied chiefly in the Torah and in the Talmud
2.mitzvah - (Judaism) a good deed performed out of religious duty
human action, human activity, act, deed - something that people do or cause to happen
Judaism - the monotheistic religion of the Jews having its spiritual and ethical principles embodied chiefly in the Torah and in the Talmud
References in periodicals archive ?
Toba's Passage" is a consistently engaging immigrant story that effectively portrays a family committed to keeping Shabbos, Torah, and mitzvos no matter where they are.
Many people are already keeping a half-Shabbos because they find that they can't get off their phones and they feel like once they are already breaking Shabbos they might as well give up on other mitzvos too," he continued.
The 31-year-old assured bidders that he had lived a life full of Mitzvos (good deeds), and had never worshipped false gods and is still 98 percent vegan.
When the Messiah did not emerge, Lubavitch women reframed the meanings of the tambourines as important reminders to continue to perform mitzvos to hasten that longed-for redemption.
Rabbi Yosef Dov Ber Soloveitchik explains that "by saying, 'we will do' before 'we will listen,' [t]hey undertook to perform the mitzvos out of blind obedience .