Mixe-Zoquean

Mi·xe-Zo·que·an

(mē′hā-sō-kā′ən)
n.
A family of languages spoken in southern Mexico and including Mixe and Zoque.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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It belongs to the Gulf Zoquean subgroup of the Mixe-Zoquean language family, she says, and is spoken by about 28,000 people through the municipalities of Soteapan, Tatahuicapan, and Hueyapan de Ocampo.
Even more recently, Ball and Taschek have also argued that the Cunil and the subsequent Jenney Creek traditions of the Belize Valley pertain to non-Maya groups, possibly Mixe-Zoquean speakers, migrating from the southeastern Maya highlands [5].
More recent linguistic data have put into doubt these perspectives: the timing of the Mixe-Zoquean linguistic borrowing has now been placed in the Late Preclassic, and not around 1000 BC [1, 76], while the assumption behind glottochronology (that languages change at a steady rate) is now untenable [1, 77].
Examples can be seen in Sierra Popoluca, a Mixe-Zoquean language indigenous to Mexico.
The Relationship among Mixe-Zoquean Languages of Mexico.